amylopectin


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amylopectin

 [am″ĭ-lo-pek´tin]
the insoluble constituent of starch; the soluble constituent is amylose.

am·y·lo·pec·tin

(am'i-lō-pek'tin),
A branched-chain polyglucose (glucan) in starch containing both 1,4 and 1,6 linkages. Compare: amylose.

amylopectin

/am·y·lo·pec·tin/ (am″ĭ-lo-pek´tin) a highly branched, water-insoluble glucan, the insoluble constituent of starch; the soluble constituent is amylose.

amylopectin

(ăm′ə-lō-pĕk′tĭn)
n.
A highly branched polysaccharide of high molecular weight that is one of the two main components, along with amylose, of starches.

am·y·lo·pec·tin

(am'i-lō-pek'tin)
A branched-chain polyglucose (glucan) in starch containing both 1,4 and 1,6 linkages.
Compare: amylose

amylopectin

a carbohydrate polymer, of high molecular weight, composed of branched chains of GLUCOSE units.

amylopectin

the insoluble constituent of starch; the soluble constituent is amylose.
References in periodicals archive ?
Such crosslinks would prevent leaching out of amylopectin and this may contribute to increased viscosity.
It contains two different starches: an amylopectin exterior, which softens faster--especially under the pressure of constant stirring--to create a creamy sensation in the mouth; and an amylose interior, which stays relatively firm during cooking to give you that al dente bite.
It is considered that two types of extracellular amylases, glucoamylase and the endo-type amylase (alpha-amylase), are associated with nutritional decomposition of barley starch composing 25 percent amylose and 75 percent amylopectin (Terashita et al.
However, the activity of SHE toward amylopectin results in hydrolysis products that are distinctly different from those of other alpha-amylases.
Topics of the other nine chapters include microalgae in novel food products, the ochratoxin A concentration in wines, the role of amylose and amylopectin in starchy foods, protein and lipid recovery from food processing by-products, and the gelation of high methoxy pectins.
Class (DP) Subgroup Components Sugars (1-2) Monosaccharides Glucose, galactose, fructose Disaccharides Sucrose, lactose, trehalose Polyols Lactitol, xylitol, sorbitol, mannitol Oligosaccharides Malto-oligosaccharides Maltodextrins (3-9) Other oligosaccharides Raffinose, stachyose, fructo- oligosaccharides Polysaccharides (>9) Starch Amylose, amylopectin, modified starches Non-starch Cellulose, polysaccharides hemicelluloses, polydextrose, pectins, hydrocolloids
Ring, The role of amylose and amylopectin in the gelation and retrogradation of starch, Carbohydrate Research 135 (1985) pp.
Legume starch is comprised of relatively high levels of linear amylose and less branched amylopectin than many cereal grains.
Reducing the molecular weight of amylose by alpha-amylase action before beta-amylase activity markedly reduced the fermentability of the wort so produced, but this effect was less obvious with amylopectin or starch itself as a substrate.
Postoperative heart biopsies from patients have shown minimal amylopectin deposits up to 4 1/2 years following transplantation.
In contrast, other highly sulfated polysaccharides, amylopectin sulfate and dextran sulfate sodium, have induced ulcerations and neoplasia, suggesting that the degree of sulfation and polysaccharide molecular weight may be critical for induction of the observed effects (102).