amoeboid


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Related to amoeboid: Amoeboid movement

amoeboid

(ə-mē′boid′)
adj.
Of or resembling an amoeba, especially in changeability of form and means of locomotion.

a·me·boid

(ă-mē'boyd)
1. Resembling an ameba in appearance or characteristics.
2. Of irregular outline with peripheral projections; denoting the outline of a form of colony in plate culture.
Synonym(s): amoeboid.
[ameba + G. eidos, appearance]

amoeboid

Resembling an amoeba, especially in its method of locomotion. An amoeba is a shapeless, jelly-like, single-celled organism that moves by pushing out a protrusion, a pseudopodium, in the required direction and then flowing into it.

amoeboid

moving and feeding in the manner of Amoeba, by the action of PSEUDOPODIA.
References in periodicals archive ?
Amoeboid tapeta have been found in 32 angiosperm families, of which 14 are dicots.
Gentiana acaulis that has anthers with orbicules and an amoeboid tapetum type (Lombardo & Carraro, 1976).
Amoeboid Protist: Body Builder from the Mediterranean
COMPARED to most of the new species on the list, the single-cell amoeboid protist is a giant, coming in at a staggering four to five centimetres tall.
Antimicrobial and cytolytic polypeptides of amoeboid protozoa-effector molecules of primitive phagocytes.
Importantly, microglia largely remain in an activated, amoeboid state until the early postnatal period (Ling and Wong 2004), which makes them especially sensitive to long-term functional changes by perinatal inflammatory events (Bilbo and Schwarz 2009; Williamson et al.
Three amoeboid verticals standing nearly two feet tall were intermingled throughout the show.
Yi's amoeboid practice squirms across media and modes of presentation, attaching itself at random to pedestals, walls, and the gallery floor.
There are two major types of tapetum, the more primitive secretory type, considered to be the prevalent type in the majority of plants, and amoeboid type that extends to microspores in the anther locule [9].
Slime molds are not actually molds or even fungi; rather, they are classified as amoeboid protozoans.
The crowd was no longer the "huge, harmless, amoeboid mass that took its shape from the streets, changing as they changed, yet remaining intact, of a piece" (Marshall, The Chosen Place 292).