amnioinfusion


Also found in: Acronyms.

amnioinfusion

 [am″ne-o-in-fu´zhun]
1. injection of solutions into the amniotic fluid, usually to induce abortion.
2. infusion of normal saline to increase intra-amniotic fluid in cases of oligohydramnios or rupture of the membranes; this may reduce the number and severity of variable decelerations due to cord compression during labor; see also fetal monitoring.
3. in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the infusion of fluid into the uterus during labor to relieve umbilical cord compression or to dilute meconium-stained fluid.

am·ni·o·in·fu·sion

(am'nē-ō-in-fyu'zhŭn),
Infusion of warmed saline through an intrauterine catheter during labor, for umbilical cord compromise due to low volume of amnionic fluid, or for thick meconium in labor.

amnioinfusion

/am·nio·in·fu·sion/ (-in-fu´zhun) introduction of solutions into the amnion.

amnioinfusion

a nursing intervention from the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC) defined as infusion of fluid into the uterus during labor to relieve umbilical cord compression or to dilute meconium-stained fluid. See also Nursing Interventions Classification.

amnioinfusion

Intra-amniotic infusion Obstetrics The injection of any fluid into the amniotic cavity, either to
1. Replenish intra-uterine volume after rupture of membranes to facilitate fetal manipulation before a vaginal deliver, or.
2. To induce labor. See Saline abortion, Prostaglandin abortion.

am·ni·o·in·fu·sion

(am'nē-ō-in-fyū'zhŭn)
Infusion of warmed saline through an intrauterine catheter during labor, for umbilical cord compromise due to low volume of amnionic fluid, or for thick meconium in labor.
References in periodicals archive ?
Amnioinfusion of 600 mL normal saline was accomplished with the aid of an electronic infusion pump.
An amnioinfusion of 500 mL normal saline bolus was followed by 125 mL per hour.
The case series of Strong et al (26) describes 18 women who received amnioinfusion for the indications of oligohydramnios and/or deep variable decelerations during their trial of labor.
This retrospective cohort study has two control groups: women undergoing a TOLAC who did not undergo amnioinfusion and those who had not had a previous cesarean who required amnioinfusion.
Table 1 describes the rate of complications in women who underwent amnioinfusion.
There is insufficient evidence to draw firm conclusions concerning the safety of amnioinfusion in women with a previous cesarean delivery.
That is to say, in women undergoing amnioinfusion during a TOLAC compared with those without previous cesarean, 1 more out of every 11 may have amnionitis, presumably requiring antibiotics and prolonging hospital stay.
If one considers deep variable decelerations a predictor of uterine rupture, using amnioinfusion in the face of decelerations in patients with oligohydramnios may lead to women not being treated for cord compression but instead further compromising a uterus predisposed to rupture.
It is clear that further studies are needed to determine if amnioinfusion in women undergoing a trial of labor after cesarean section is a safe procedure and does not increase the risk of uterine rupture.
Pending repetition of their work, the state of the literature is insufficient to recommend unequivocally for or against the use of amnioinfusion in women after previous cesarean delivery.
Amnioinfusion for meconium-stained liquor in labour (Cochrane Review).
Intrapartum amnioinfusion for meconium-stained fluid: metananalysis of prospective clinical trials.