ammoniac


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am·mo·ni·ac

(ă-mō'nē-ak),
A gum resin from a plant of western Asia, Dorema ammoniacum (family Umbelliferae); used internally as a stimulant and expectorant, and externally as a counterirritant plaster.

ammoniac

(ə-mō′nē-ăk′)
n.
A strong-smelling gum resin from the stems of a plant (Dorema ammoniacum) of western Asia, formerly used in perfumery and in medicine as an expectorant and a stimulant. Also called gum ammoniac.
References in periodicals archive ?
Problems and technical solutions in the production of complex fertilizers on the basis of ammoniac petre," Newsletter "World of sulphur, N, P and K [Byulleten "Mir sery, N, R i K"], in Russian, No.
The researcher and her team have proved that these and other compounds originate from the cyanide liberated by the salt Prussian blue when it is subjected for several days to conditions of pH12 and relatively high temperatures (70-150 degrees C) in a damp, oxygen-free ammoniac environment, similar to early conditions on Earth.
ii) Although the words were chosen because of their challenging morphology, algebre, ammoniac, vermicelles and alcoolemie are not uncommon, while most French adults will have heard of halogene, algorithme and alchimie.
The ammoniac quality of brie, for instance, can render many wines, red and white alike, bitter-tasting.
I have a fiendish plan," said Ammoniac, after a moment prodding the fire with his trident.
This is accomplished by treating the hair with alkaline reducing agents such as ammonium thioglycolate in an ammoniac solution (pH of about 9.
Not far from the upper-class horsemen of the country estate, William works near the stables, enduring the "steaming scent of dung, the ammoniac whiff of horse-piss"(25); he is engaged in the tedious labour of sorting Harald's collections of specimens of frogs and beetles, which lie in a heap of negligence, reflecting the aging aristocrat's obvious decay.
Among them were mercury and sal ammoniac (ammonium chloride), the latter being a white or colorless crystalline salt found in volcanic regions.
5% solution called "AdBlue" in Europe is turned into ammoniac in the exhaust gas flow using hydrolysis.
From the start, every surface had to be meticulously clean and smooth before being immersed in a flux of sal ammoniac prior to a coat of molten tin.
It was a homely workshop, that smelled of damp paper sacks of plaster, chemical resins, clay dust, enamel paints, oiled tools and the peculiar ammoniac bite of uncured latex that was soon to become all too familiar.