amine


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Related to amine: amide

amine

 [am´in, ah´mēn]
an organic compound containing nitrogen.
biogenic amine bioamine.
sympathomimetic a's amines that mimic the actions of the sympathetic nervous system, the group includes the catecholamines and drugs that mimic their actions.
vasoactive a's amines that cause vasodilation and increase small vessel permeability, such as histamine and serotonin.

a·mine

, primary aminesecondary aminetertiary aminequaternary ammonium ion (ă-mēn', am'in), Although this word is correctly stressed on the first syllable, U.S. usage often stresses it on the last syllable.
A substance formally derived from ammonia by the replacement of one or more of the hydrogen atoms by hydrocarbon or other radicals. The substitution of one hydrogen atom constitutes a primary amine; that of two atoms, a secondary amine; that of three atoms, a tertiary amine; and that of four atoms, a quaternary ammonium ion, a positively charged ion isolated only in association with a negative ion. The amines form salts with acids.

amine

(ah-mēn´) (am´in) an organic compound containing nitrogen; any of a group of compounds formed from ammonia by replacement of one or more hydrogen atoms by organic radicals.
biogenic amine  a type of amine synthesized by plants and animals and frequently involved in signaling, e.g., neurotransmitters such as acetylcholine, catecholamines, and serotonin; others are hormones or components of vitamins, phospholipids, bacteria, or ribosomes, e.g., cadaverine, choline, histamine, and spermine.
sympathomimetic amines  amines that mimic the actions of the sympathetic nervous system, comprising the catecholamines and drugs that mimic their actions.

amine

[am′in, əmēn′]
Etymology: L, ammonia
(in chemistry) an organic derivative of ammonia in which one or more hydrogen atoms are replaced by alkyl or aryl groups.

a·mine

(ă-mēn')
A substance derived from ammonia by the replacement of one or more of the hydrogen atoms by hydrocarbon or other radicals. The substitution of one hydrogen atom constitutes a primary amine, e.g., NH2CH3; that of two atoms, a secondary amine, e.g., NH(CH3)2; that of three atoms, a tertiary amine, e.g., N(CH3)3; and that of four atoms, a quaternary ammonium ion, e.g., +N(CH3)4, a positively charged ion isolated only in association with a negative ion. The amines form salts with acids.

amine

A class of organic compounds derived from ammonia by replacing one or more of the hydrogen atoms by a member of the paraffin series or by an aromatic group. Amines occur widely in the body, and many drugs are amines.

amine

an organic base formed by replacing one or more of the hydrogen atoms of ammonia by organic groups.

a·mine

(ă-mēn') Although this word is correctly stressed on the first syllable, U.S. usage often stresses it on the last syllable as shown here.
A substance formally derived from ammonia by the replacement of one or more of the hydrogen atoms by hydrocarbon or other radicals.

amine

an organic compound containing nitrogen.

biogenic a's
amine neurotransmitters, e.g. norepinephrine, serotonin and dopamine.
direct-acting sympathomimetic a's
activate adrenergic effector cells, e.g. catecholamine, directly and do not need adrenergic nerves to exert their effects.
amine hormones
enteroendocrine cells, distributed widely in the gastric, intestinal and pancreatic tissue, synthesize peptide and amine hormones that control the secretion of digestive juices. See also apud cells.
amine precursor uptake and decarboxylation cells
toxic a's
occur in plants, e.g. cyclopamine, tyramine.
vasoactive amine
amine that causes vasodilatation and increases small vessel permeability, e.g. histamine and serotonin.
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The introduction of SIVATETM A610 activated amine silane is an example of Gelest's customer-centric research and development.
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Considering the large market associated with Vitis labrusca grapes in Brazil, the lack of literature on its wine composition and on the relevant topic of food safety, the objectives of the present research were (1) to identify the amino acid and bioactive amines profile of Brazilian common wines and to correlate amine levels to physical and chemical parameters; (2) to classify wine samples according to their geographical origin through amino acid and bioactive amine contents.
Amines demand growth in pesticides will moderate following a prolonged period of strong advances.
21 g of amine was added to 22 g of organic phase (UP in styrene) and mixed at low speed.
The new company will benefit from the sales activities of relevant amines and defined derivatives of Clarianta[euro](tm)s Industrial & Consumer Specialties (ICS) business unit as well as its amines plant in Germany and production output from its amines plant in Brazil.
Results of tests of the Amine Shield slipstream unit in the Aramco plants showed that suspended-solids removal rate across the unit reached up to 90 per cent.
The Qatar Shell Research & Technology Centre at Qatar Science & Technology Park has set up an amine solvent management programme, a technical service aimed at benefiting clients in Qatar and the region.