ameloblastoma


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ameloblastoma

 [ah-mel″o-blas-to´mah]
a locally invasive, highly destructive tumor of the jaw; called also adamantinoma.
pituitary ameloblastoma craniopharyngioma.

am·e·lo·blas·to·ma

(am'ĕ-lō-blas-tō'mă),
A benign odontogenic epithelial neoplasm that histologically mimics the embryonal enamel organ but does not differentiate from it to the point of forming dental hard tissues; it behaves as a slowly growing expansile radiolucent tumor, occurs most commonly in the posterior regions of the mandible and tends to recur if inadequately excised.
[ameloblast + G. -oma, tumor]

ameloblastoma

/am·e·lo·blas·to·ma/ (-blas-to´mah) a usually benign but locally invasive neoplasm of tissue of the type characteristic of the enamel organ, but which does not differentiate to the point of enamel formation.
melanotic ameloblastoma  melanotic neuroectodermal tumor.
pituitary ameloblastoma  craniopharyngioma.

ameloblastoma

[am′əlōblastō′mə]
Etymology: OFr, amel + Gk, blastos, germ, oma
a rare, highly destructive, benign, rapidly growing tumor of the jaw. Also called adamantinoma, adamantoblastoma, epithelioma adamantinum.
enlarge picture
Ameloblastoma

ameloblastoma

A locally aggressive but almost invariably benign tumour that arises from the odontogenic epithelium in a fibrous stroma of the mandible or maxilla, which is more common in males in their 40s.
 
Management
Wide local excision; may recur.

ameloblastoma

Adamantinoma A locally-aggressive, but almost invariably benign tumor that arises from the odontogenic epithelium in a fibrous stroma of the mandible or maxilla, which is most common in ♂ in the 4th decade Treatment Wide local excision; may recur

am·e·lo·blas·to·ma

(am'el'ō-blas-tō'mă)
A benign odontogenic epithelial neoplasm; it behaves as a slowly growing expansile radiolucent tumor, occurs most commonly in the posterior regions of the mandible, and has a marked tendency to recur if inadequately excised.
[ameloblast + G. -oma, tumor]

ameloblastoma

A BENIGN tumour arising from the tissue that gives rise to the tooth internal lining. Ameloblastomas usually occur in the lower jaw (mandible) and are also known as adamantinomas.

am·e·lo·blas·to·ma

(am'el'ō-blas-tō'mă)
Benign odontogenic epithelial neoplasm that histologically mimics the embryonal enamel organ but does not differentiate from it to the point of forming dental hard tissues; behaves as a slowly growing expansile radiolucent tumor; occurs most commonly in the posterior regions of the mandible and tends to recur if inadequately excised.
[ameloblast + G. -oma, tumor]

ameloblastoma (am´əlōblastō´mə),

n an epithelial neoplasm with a basic structure resembling the enamel organ and suggesting derivation from ameloblastic cells. It is usually benign but aggressive. Also called
adamantinoblastoma or
adamantinoma.
ameloblastoma, acanthomatous,
n a type that differs from the simple form in that the central cells within the cell nests are squamous and may be keratinized rather than stellate. The peripheries of the cell nests are composed of ameloblastic cells. See also ameloblastoma.

ameloblastoma

a locally invasive, highly destructive tumor of the jaw consisting of proliferating odontogenic epithelium in a fibrous stroma.

pituitary ameloblastoma
References in periodicals archive ?
22) The premolar-first molar location is common for a maxillary ameloblastoma.
Ameloblastomas are rare benign odontogenic tumours, most commonly found in a patient's lower jaw.
Characteristics reminiscent of ameloblastoma, such as alveolar patterns and peripheral palisading of cells, may be exhibited in some PIOSCCs, but typical features of ameloblastic differentiation that would justify a diagnosis of ameloblastic carcinoma are lacking.
Expression of ICAM-1 & VCAM-1 in human ameloblastoma & odontogenic keratocyst, Shanghai Kou Qiang Yi Xue.
A case of a maxillary ameloblastoma with an unusual initial presentation of nasal obstruction and with recurrence after radical surgery in the frontal and ethmoid sinuses is described.
This special issue of the AMEDD Journal closes with an excellent, clearly presented clinical report describing treatment of another type of oral tumor, an ameloblastoma.
The squamous variant may recall well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma with keratinization or may display central discohesion reminiscent of the stellate reticulum of ameloblastoma (formerly adamantinoma).
The pathologic diagnosis was squamous cell carcinoma in 25 patients (96%) and ameloblastoma in 1 (3.
The ameloblastoma is the most commonly found odontogenic neoplasm.
The tumors had a conspicuous clear cell epithelial component, with or without separate areas of tumor elements exhibiting some morphologic features similar to ameloblastoma.
Presentation of an ameloblastoma exclusively in the sinonasal tract is extremely rare, with few reported cases in the literature.
5] Acanthomatous ameloblastoma features squamous islands with a peripheral palisaded layer of columnar polarized cells.