amelia


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Related to amelia: Amelia Earhart

anomaly

 [ah-nom´ah-le]
marked deviation from normal. adj., adj anom´alous.
Axenfeld's anomaly a developmental anomaly characterized by a circular opacity of the posterior peripheral cornea, and caused by an irregularly thickened, axially displaced Schwalbe's ring.
congenital anomaly (developmental anomaly) absence, deformity, or excess of body parts as the result of faulty development of the embryo.
Ebstein's anomaly see ebstein's anomaly.
May-Hegglin anomaly a rare dominantly inherited disorder of blood cell morphology, characterized by RNA-containing cytoplasmic inclusions (similar to Döhle bodies) in granulocytes, by large, poorly granulated platelets, and by thrombocytopenia.

a·me·li·a

(ă-mē'lē-ă),
Congenital absence of a limb or limbs. Autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, and X-linked forms have been reported, but most cases are sporadic.
[G. a- priv. + melos, a limb]

amelia

/ame·lia/ (ah-me´le-ah) congenital absence of a limb or limbs.

amelia

[əmē′lyə]
Etymology: Gk, a, melos, not limb
1 a congenital anomaly marked by the absence of one or more limbs. The term may be modified to indicate the number of legs or arms missing at birth, such as tetramelia for the absence of all four limbs.
2 a psychological trait of apathy or indifference associated with certain forms of psychosis.

amelia

(1) Limblessness.
(2) An obsolete term for a period of euphoria occurring in the manic phase of bipolar disorder, formerly, manic-depressive psychosis.

amelia

Limblessness. See Phocomelia.

a·me·li·a

(ă-mē'lē-ă)
Congenital absence of a limb or limbs.
[G. a- priv. + melos, a limb]

amelia (·mē·lē·),

n 1. missing a limb, or limbs.
2. psychotic symptom characterized by extreme indifference or apathy in certain mental illnesses.

a·me·li·a

(ă-mē'lē-ă)
Congenital absence of a limb or limbs.
[G. a- priv. + melos, a limb]

amelia (əmel´ēə, əmē´lēə),

n a congenital abnormality characterized by the absence of one or more limbs.

amelia

a developmental anomaly with absence of the limbs; an inherited defect in cattle.
References in periodicals archive ?
On August 21 this year, as the family waited for news of a new heart, Amelia went into cardiac arrest another three times.
Amelia Jones was just 41 days old when she was murdered <B
Amelia, centre, with sisters Maddie, 10, and Matilda, seven, |and mum Rachel, above
Amelia wanted to fly with our friend, Captain Spaulding, but regulations against civilian passengers were strict, so we had to be content to be spectators.
She suggests that John and Amelia met for the first time in Norwich probably in the winter of 1798, thus placing them at a safe geographical and temporal distance from the far less conventional circumstances of their first meetings with one another.
Fish to Fork" festivities challenge six award-winning chefs from around the country to join Amelia Island charter captains for a fishing excursion before turning their catch-of-the-day into scrumptious seafood during the weekend's main event.
Below, Amelia, having her hair |chopped off to send to the Little Princess Trust to be made into a wig
I think Liam was one of the youngest to take the exam, but Amelia may beat him now.
Amelia Rose Earhart is a philanthropist in Denver, CO, where she is president of the Fly with Amelia Foundation.
If someone starts talking about a boat or if I see pictures - the memories come back," Amelia said.
AmeriTales Presents Amelia Earhart and the Haunted Winds of Kansas