ambivalence

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ambivalence

 [am-biv´ah-lens]
simultaneous existence of conflicting emotions, attitudes, ideas, or wishes toward a goal, object, or person. adj., adj ambiv´alent.

am·biv·a·lence

(am-biv'ă-lens),
The coexistence of antithetical attitudes or emotions toward a given person or thing, or idea, as in the simultaneous feeling and expression of love and hate toward the same person. See: approach-avoidance conflict.
[ambi- + L. valentia, strength]

ambivalence

/am·biv·a·lence/ (am-biv´ah-lens) simultaneous existence of conflicting attitudes, emotions, ideas, or wishes toward the same object.ambiv´alent

ambivalence

[ambiv′ələns]
Etymology: L, ambo, both, valentia, strength
1 a state in which a person concomitantly experiences conflicting feelings, attitudes, drives, desires, or emotions, such as love and hate, tenderness and cruelty, pleasure and pain toward the same person, place, object, or situation. To some degree, ambivalence is normal. Treatment in severe, debilitating cases consists of psychotherapy appropriate to the underlying cause.
2 uncertainty and fluctuation caused by an inability to make a choice between opposites.
3 a continuous oscillation or fluctuation. ambivalent, adj.

ambivalence

Psychiatry
The simultaneous presence of opposing emotions, formally termed affective ambivalence; it is relatively common and seen in subconscious “love-hate” relationships with others. It is only regarded as pathological if extreme—e.g., the desire to live and die (which typifies suicidal ideation), or passive aggressive behaviour. Ambivalence may occur in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.

Suicidology
A suicidal person’s wish to both/neither live and/nor die.

ambivalence

Psychiatry The coexistence of contradictory emotions, attitudes, ideas, or desires vis-á-vis a particular person, object, or situation

am·biv·a·lence

(am-biv'ă-lĕns)
The coexistence of conflicting or opposing attitudes or emotions toward a given person, thing, or idea, as in the simultaneous feeling and expression of love and hate toward the same person.
[ambi- + L. valentia, strength]
References in periodicals archive ?
Meanwhile, a dogma that cannot accommodate Wright's relentlessly questioning disposition (his tendency to ambivalence, which he shares with Invisible Man) may inevitably eye him with violent intent as well.
In spite of his inclination to be bitterly patronizing, though, Wright retains the ambivalence of a true doubting Westerner.
In the same era, the ambivalence and resistance of German social arbiters towards the Sexual Revolution and the women's movement is expressed in the statement that it is unavoidable that men and women work together in the same room, often right next to each other.