ambivalence


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ambivalence

 [am-biv´ah-lens]
simultaneous existence of conflicting emotions, attitudes, ideas, or wishes toward a goal, object, or person. adj., adj ambiv´alent.

am·biv·a·lence

(am-biv'ă-lens),
The coexistence of antithetical attitudes or emotions toward a given person or thing, or idea, as in the simultaneous feeling and expression of love and hate toward the same person. See: approach-avoidance conflict.
[ambi- + L. valentia, strength]

ambivalence

/am·biv·a·lence/ (am-biv´ah-lens) simultaneous existence of conflicting attitudes, emotions, ideas, or wishes toward the same object.ambiv´alent

ambivalence

[ambiv′ələns]
Etymology: L, ambo, both, valentia, strength
1 a state in which a person concomitantly experiences conflicting feelings, attitudes, drives, desires, or emotions, such as love and hate, tenderness and cruelty, pleasure and pain toward the same person, place, object, or situation. To some degree, ambivalence is normal. Treatment in severe, debilitating cases consists of psychotherapy appropriate to the underlying cause.
2 uncertainty and fluctuation caused by an inability to make a choice between opposites.
3 a continuous oscillation or fluctuation. ambivalent, adj.

ambivalence

Psychiatry
The simultaneous presence of opposing emotions, formally termed affective ambivalence; it is relatively common and seen in subconscious “love-hate” relationships with others. It is only regarded as pathological if extreme—e.g., the desire to live and die (which typifies suicidal ideation), or passive aggressive behaviour. Ambivalence may occur in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.

Suicidology
A suicidal person’s wish to both/neither live and/nor die.

ambivalence

Psychiatry The coexistence of contradictory emotions, attitudes, ideas, or desires vis-á-vis a particular person, object, or situation

am·biv·a·lence

(am-biv'ă-lĕns)
The coexistence of conflicting or opposing attitudes or emotions toward a given person, thing, or idea, as in the simultaneous feeling and expression of love and hate toward the same person.
[ambi- + L. valentia, strength]
References in periodicals archive ?
In short, jihadist zeal is easy to condemn, but will require multiple revolutions to stem -- revolutions that will require a lot of people in the Arab-Muslim world and West to shed their ambivalence and stop playing double games.
Drilling down into attitudes about "campus carry" legislation again reveals the ambivalence underlying those attitudes.
12-14) Thus, recognizing pregnancy ambivalence is important for family planning policy and programming efforts.
10) Many readers' ambivalence towards Laura in Rossetti's Goblin Market seems to me a case in point.
Lee's historical survey provides ample and interesting examples of pervasive and continuing body ambivalence within Christianity.
His father is not the only immigrant to feel this ambivalence.
Fuller's tendency to displace her sense of alienation onto hybrid surrogates, however, must be distinguished from Prince and Seacole, who often found themselves internalizing and symptomatically writing this colonial ambivalence towards nation as empire.
Now, Gerson devotes considerable effort to documenting the state's ambivalence about advancing the localist cause.
A person's voice can reveal many emotions: happiness, sadness, anger, even ambivalence.
Some of the mainstream press reacted with ambivalence and even hostility.
Ambivalence stage, the task is to resolve problems that interfere with participants' role commitments.
A person who makes a bedside decision to withdraw care from a dying loved one cannot but feel some ambivalence about the decision, even if they are convinced it is the right or best decision, all things considered, but it is difficult to express this ambivalence without seeming to draw back from the decision.