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am·big·u·ous

(am-big'yū-ŭs),
1. Having more than one interpretation.
2. In anatomy, wandering; having more than one direction.
3. In neuroanatomy, applied to a nucleus (nucleus ambiguus) supplying special visceral efferent fibers to the vagus and glossopharyngeal nerves.
[L. ambiguus, fr. ambigo, to wander]

ambiguous

[ambig′yo̅o̅·əs]
Etymology: L, ambiguus, to wander
having more than one direction, development, or interpretation or meaning.

ambiguous

adjective Having more than 1 possible meaning; equivocal.

am·big·u·ous

(am-big'yū-ŭs)
1. Having more than one interpretation.
2. In anatomy, wandering; having more than one direction.
3. In neuroanatomy, applied to a nucleus (nucleus ambiguus) supplying special visceral efferent fibers to the vagus and glossopharyngeal nerves.
[L. ambiguus, fr. ambigo, to wander]
References in periodicals archive ?
When a poet such as Sjon (Sigurjon Birgir Sigurdsson) writes a novel, the reader may expect the elliptical in both senses of the word--economy and ambiguousness.
It is because of this conscious strategy of ambiguousness that this is a dirty war.
Similar elements have also been brought to Venoistodus balticus by Lofgren (2006); however, see Mellgren & Eriksson (2010) for a brief discussion on the ambiguousness concerning this taxon.
It is this bewildering ambiguousness of life Desai's weltanschauung weaves and the signifying code suggests the same.
The fourth dimension--organizational--has been defined in relation to three components: job ambiguousness, job conflict, and perceived job expectations and professional responsibility (Bargal & Guterman, 1996).
This ambiguousness is a common feature of such writings, nowhere more so than in the following, taken from Deborah Rose's book Nourishing Terrains: