ambergris


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am·ber·gris

(am'bĕr-gris), The s in this word is not silent.
A grayish pathologic secretion from the intestine of the sperm whale that occurs as a flammable waxy mass (melting point about 60°C), insoluble in water; contains cholesterol and benzoic acid; used as a base for perfume.
[Mod. L. ambra grisea, gray amber]

ambergris

a substance, used in the manufacture of perfume, found in the alimentary canal of sperm whales in the form of a grey waxy secretion.

ambergris

a solid, gray intestinal concretion of sperm whales. It has an unpleasant odor but is very valuable in the formulation of expensive perfumes. Is found floating free after evacuation.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Amouage, one of international luxury perfume brands from Oman, uses ambergris to make its perfumes, which are some of the most expensive in the world.
Ambergris is used to make perfume and it is extremely rare.
Ambergris is a 25-mile-long island in the Caribbean Sea, off the northeastern Belize coastline.
Ambergris is a fatty substance produced in the guts of male sperm whales to help them pass indigestible bits of food such as the beaks of giant squids.
A five-day package for Ambergris Caye in Belize features the three-star Mata Rocks Resort, priced from $585 per person, double occupancy.
The Phoenix, a beachside resort in Ambergris Caye, Belize, has announced a Toy Drive for less fortunate children.
She examines in turn, the scents frankincense, rose, sassafras, rosemary, ambergris, and jasmine, noting their manner of use, cultural and religious roles, economic properties, and what their use can tell us about the way our olfactory senses have shaped our interactions with one another and our environment.
Three new indoor/outdoor lines will also debut: the Ambergris hooked collection of hooked designs of tile-inspired, nature-inspired, filigree and scrollwork; Lido Collection which has an understated decorating theme; and Landon, a new no-pile group that spotlights texture with minimalist patterns and natural hues.
Honestly, trust me, ambergris has long been a staple ingredient in perfume-making and contains a sweet heady odour so powerful it'll probably fragrance your entire house.
In Germany, Eau de Cologne had anti-bacterial properties as well as smelling nice; similarly, ambergris was used a medicine by the nobility of Europe when the continent was wracked by bouts of the plague.
His previous books include City of Saints and Madmen (2001) and Shriek: An Afterword (2006) (the first two volumes of the Ambergris cycle), and Veniss Underground (2003).
Helpful Heston informed us that ambergris is, pound for pound, more expensive than gold and that King Charles II couldn't get enough of it.