amaurosis fugax


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

amaurosis

 [am″aw-ro´sis]
loss of sight without apparent lesion of the eye, as from disease of the optic nerve, spine, or brain.
amaurosis conge´nita (amaurosis congenita of Leber) (congenital amaurosis) hereditary blindness occurring at or shortly after birth, associated with an atypical form of diffuse pigmentation and commonly with optic atrophy and attenuation of the retinal vessels.
amaurosis fu´gax sudden temporary or fleeting blindness.
Leber's congenital amaurosis amaurosis congenita.

am·au·ro·sis fu·'gax

a transient blindness that may result from a transient ischemia resulting from carotid artery insufficiency or retinal artery embolus, or to centrifugal force (visual blackout in flight).

amaurosis fugax

[fo̅o̅′gaks]
a transient episodic blindness caused by decreased blood flow to the retina. Compare amaurosis.

amaurosis fugax

Transient retinal ischemia, see there.

am·au·ro·sis fu·gax

(am'aw-rō'sis fū'gaks)
Transient blindness that may result from carotid artery insufficiency, retinal artery embolus, or centrifugal force (visual blackout in flight).

amaurosis fugax

Transient loss of vision, usually for a few seconds or minutes caused by interference to the blood supply to parts of the brain or eye by tiny EMBOLI or by spasm of the arteries supplying the eye. Repeated attacks can damage the RETINA and the condition is a warning of the grave danger of STROKE. Amaurosis fugax is a form of TRANSIENT ISCHAEMIC ATTACK.

amaurosis fugax 

Transient unilateral loss of vision. The visual loss varies from partial to total blindness and rarely lasts longer than 10 minutes. It is usually caused by a temporary occlusion in the internal carotid artery, which produces an insufficient blood flow to the ophthalmic artery and may lead to closure of the central retinal artery. Syn. blackout. See fluorescein angiography; temporal arteritis; blackout; bruit; Hollenhorst's plaques; retinal arterial occlusion.
References in periodicals archive ?
To the Editor: Amaurosis fugax is a term frequently used to describe transient monocular blindness.
There was a significant inverse relationship between the degree of carotid arterial distension and the risk of cerebrovascular disease, defined as stroke, transient ischemic attack, retinal infarction, or amaurosis fugax.
For amaurosis fugax, the risk is 17% at 2 years versus 43% for transient hemispheric attacks.
Ophthalmic presentations of GCA include arteritic anterior ischaemic optic neuropathy (AAOIN), which may be preceded by amaurosis fugax.
An example of such a transient ischaemic attack (TIA) is amaurosis fugax (fleeting darkness) in which, for example, a thrombosis which formed on an atherosclerotic plaque in the carotid artery might become dislodged, travel into the ophthalmic artery and eventually lodge in the central retinal artery, leading to a painless loss of vision in the affected eye.
Symptoms include ocular pain and visual loss including amaurosis fugax.