allergen

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allergen

 [al´er-jen]
1. a substance, protein or nonprotein, capable of inducing allergy or specific hypersensitivity.
2. a purified protein of a food (such as milk, eggs, or wheat), bacterium, or pollen. adj., adj allergen´ic. Allergens are used to test a patient for hypersensitivity to specific substances (see skin test). They are also used to desensitize or hyposensitize allergic individuals (see immunotherapy).

Almost any substance in the environment can be an allergen. The list of known allergens includes plant pollens, spores of mold, animal dander, house dust, foods, feathers, dyes, soaps, detergents, cosmetics, plastics, and drugs. Allergens can enter the body by being inhaled, swallowed, touched, or injected. Once the allergen comes in contact with body cells it sets off a series of immune responses that can range from localized inflammation to a fatal systemic anaphylaxis.

al·ler·gen

(al'er-jen),
An antigen that induces an allergic or hypersensitive response.
[allergy + G. -gen, producing]

allergen

/al·ler·gen/ (al´er-jen) an antigenic substance capable of producing immediate hypersensitivity (allergy).allergen´ic
pollen allergen  any protein antigen of weed, tree, or grass pollens capable of causing allergic asthma or rhinitis; pollen antigen extracts are used in skin testing for pollen sensitivity and in immunotherapy (desensitization) for pollen allergy.

allergen

(ăl′ər-jən)
n.
A substance, such as pollen, that causes an allergy.

al′ler·gen′ic (-jĕn′ĭk) adj.

allergen

[al′ərjin]
Etymology: Gk, allos, other, ergein, to work, genein, to produce
an environmental substance that can produce a hypersensitive reaction in the body but may not be intrinsically harmful. Common allergens include pollen, animal dander, house dust, feathers, and various foods. Studies indicate that one of six Americans is hypersensitive to one or more allergens. Methods of identifying specific allergens affecting individuals include the patch test, the scratch test, the radioallergosorbent test, and the Prausnitz-Küstner test. See also allergic reaction, allergy. allergenic, adj.

allergen

Any biomolecular substance (antigen) capable of evoking an allergic reaction, specifically a type-1 hypersensitivity reaction through immunoglobulin E-mediated reaction.

allergen

Immunology A substance–eg, pollen, dander, mold, which can evoke an immediate-type hypersensitivity–allergic reaction, triggering a release of histamine. See Airborne allergen, Cockroach allergen, Feline allergen, Immunogenic allergen.

al·ler·gen

(al'ĕr-jĕn)
An incitant of altered reactivity (allergy), an antigenic substance.
[allergy + G. -gen, producing]

allergen

Any ANTIGEN causing ALLERGY or causing an allergic reaction in a sensitive person.

allergen

an antigen that produces an allergic response.

Allergen

A foreign substance, such as mites in house dust or animal dander which, when inhaled, causes the airways to narrow and produces symptoms of asthma.

allergen

surface protein residues (e.g. on pollens, latex) that trigger an allergic response (e.g. hayfever, asthma, eczema, dermatitis, anaphylactoid reactions) in susceptible and hypersensitive individuals

allergen,

n allergy-producing foreign substance.

al·ler·gen

(al'ĕr-jĕn)
Antigen that induces an allergic or hypersensitive response.
[allergy + G. -gen, producing]

allergen (al´urjen),

n a substance capable of producing an allergic response or antigen. Common allergens are pollens, dust, drugs, and foods. See also antigen.

allergen

1. a substance, protein or nonprotein, capable of inducing allergy or specific hypersensitivity.
2. an extract of any substance known to cause allergy.
Allergens are used to test a patient for hypersensitivity to specific substances (see skin test). They are also used to densensitize or hyposensitize allergic individuals. See immunotherapy.
Almost any substance in the environment can be an allergen. The list of known allergens includes plant pollens, spores of mold, food preservatives, dyes, drugs, inorganic chemicals and vaccines. Allergens can enter the body by being inhaled, swallowed, touched or injected. Following primary exposure to an allergen, subsequent exposures result in hypersensitivity (allergic) reactions which may be immediate or delayed, local or systemic and include anaphylaxis and contact dermatitis.

alum-precipated allergen
an allergen extract used in intradermal and scratch allergy skin testing; the allergen is adsorbed onto alum to slow antigen release and provide a slower, more persistent immune stimulation. Local tissue reactions and skin nodules may follow their use.
aqueous allergen
a form of allergen extract used in intradermal and scratch allergy skin testing. In hyposensitization regimes, it is rapidly absorbed, but requires more frequent administration.
emulsion allergen
allergen extracts prepared in propylene glycol glycerin, or mineral oil. They give the most sustained effect when used in hyposensitization regimes.

Patient discussion about allergen

Q. How do I diagnose an allergy? I think I’m allergic to something. I’ve been having running nose, sneezing, and even problems breathing every once in a while. How can I find the cause?

A. There can be thousands of materials that you are allergic to. But usually people are allergic to the same things (cats, pets in general, type of foods and so forth..). what you can do is an allergy test- It’ll cover most of the usual things. Here is a video that explains it:
http://www.5min.com/Video/Allergy-Testing-9036

Q. Can it be that I stopped being allergic to cats? is it a miracle? I was allergic to cats in my childhood, and yesterday a friend cat jumped on me and nothing happened.

A. NO,IF NOTHING HAPPENED

More discussions about allergen