altruistic behaviour

altruistic behaviour


altruistic behaviour

behaviour which involves an unselfish regard for others. In organisms other than man altruism probably only exists where the benefits to the individual performing the behaviour are greater than those to the individual to whom the particular behaviour is directed, i.e. phenotypic altruism. For example, parental care of the young is clearly of genetic benefit to the individual parent, since it ensures that its genes are transmitted. See also KIN SELECTION.
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The theory of kin selection has for some time allowed biologists to explain why some animals and other organisms adopt altruistic behaviour, at their own expense, for the benefit of their relatives.
Washington, Aug 20 ( ANI ): Manipulation might be responsible for the evolutionary origins of some helpful or altruistic behaviour, a new study has revealed.
It is thought that human brains may have evolved to favour altruistic behaviour through the development of these areas of the brain.
Release date- 16082012 - Neighbourhood income deprivation has a strong negative effect on altruistic behaviour when measured by a 'lost letter' experiment, according to new UCL research published today in PLoS One.
There has never been a time in human history when we have not relied on co-operative, altruistic behaviour for our survival.
In fact, altruistic behaviour of economic agencies has sometimes been observed and under such situations technical externalities may be exerted after internalization without intervention of parties other than the interested ones.
The results of this research is expected to better present the relationship among teachers' professional efficiency--general procrastination--teachers' altruistic behaviour and to produce significant findings that will benefit future research.
Animals are capable of love, have powerful memories, display altruistic behaviour, vanity & self- consciousness, can be caring and have a sense of fun.
Altruistic behaviour originally proved difficult to explain in evolutionary terms: in a simple Darwinian world, any gene promoting altruism should be rapidly driven to extinction.
In this sense, Hamilton's rule defines an altruistic behaviour in family firms where the cost of altruism is less than the benefit weighted by relatedness.
Empathy, the ability to mirror another person's emotions is a prerequisite for most prosaically or altruistic behaviour Eisen berg et al.