altruism

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altruism

[al′tro̅o̅·iz′əm]
a sense of unconditional concern for the welfare of others. It may be expressed at the level of the individual, the group, or the larger social system. It is one of the curative factors of participating in group therapy. altruistic, adj.

altruism

(al′troo-ĭz-ĭm) [Fr. altruisme]
Acting for the benefit of others regardless of the consequences for oneself.

involuntary altruism

An action that is taken on behalf of others not because of one's own choosing but because of coercion, fiat, or legislation.
altruist (al′troo-ist″) altruistic (al″troo-is′tik)

altruism

Behaviour manifesting unselfish concern for the advantage of others. Much seemingly altruistic behaviour can be shown, on analysis, not to be so, and there are those who hold that altruism is a myth. Most social scientists, however, accept the concept.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hashemi [21] has also considered the developing of these symbols by building of commemorative places of martyrs at important and main centers of cities and even in educational centers, revision in preparation of cultural and promotional posters, reliefs, and space- buildings (graffiti) throughout the cities by cooperation with municipalities and even in populated villages with focus on religious and cognitive awareness aspects from the martyrs, and preservation of some part of the remained works from holy defense, naming streets and plazas and schools and universities under titles of martyrs and altruist war veterans; of course, by taking the sociological and psychological aspects of promotion.
The other winners on the night were Graham Nicoll, of Barclays Wealth, who triumphed in the financial category, Claire-Elaine Arthurs, of HBJ Gateley Wareing, who beat the other legal category contenders, Pitch Consultants' Ollie Purdom, who topped the recruitment and training sector, Mace Group's Chris Hill, who won in the property and construction sector and Damien Deighan, of Altruist Medical, who led the pack in the entrepreneurial category.
3) However, an altruist, who cares about the total utility of a group of homogeneous recipients, would prefer to equalize the marginal utility of food across recipients.
As Sober and Wilson put it, "An organism need not have a mind for it to be an evolutionary altruist.
Fixed Effects Tobit Regression Estimating the Amount Contributed in the Public Goods Experiment, by Subject Type Variable Egoist Model (SE) Altruist Model (SE) Intercept -2.
One altruist may want to help the elderly, another may wish to save wildlife, but, without knowledge of the relative costs and benefits of each course of action, they have little choice but to pursue the priorities they consider most important, even if these are in fact not the most urgent.
14) But some biologists do admit that "empathy and altruism often exist where the chances for any return to the altruist are nil.
In his seminal 1965 work, The Professional Altruist, Roy Lubove was prescient in his conclusion that social work's focus on the therapeutic role has deflected attention from liaison and resource mobilization and has "created a vacuum which remains unfilled" (Lubove, 1965, p.
Tom is a true altruist, always believing that the role of EHP is to impact the human condition by providing a forum for scientific information to be used by researchers, policy makers, and individuals to improve human health around the world.
The rational altruist therefore would seek to serve others in ways in which a marginal individual contribution has a real chance of making a difference, such as giving to charity.
He's an altruist thinking he's doing everything for the best but he can't face up to his own ego.