altitude


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Related to altitude: altitude sickness

altitude

[al′tito̅o̅d]
Etymology: L, altitudo, height
the level of elevation of any location on earth with reference to a fixed surface point, which is usually sea level. Several types of health effects are associated with altitude extremes, including a greater intensity of ultraviolet radiation that results from a thinner atmosphere. Barometric pressure decreases as altitude increases, so there are fewer molecules of oxygen. Thus breathing becomes faster & deeper, although demands of physical effort and cellular respiration are the same as at a lower altitude. High-altitude cardiac intolerance is usually worse in people with blood or pulmonary disorders. See also altitude sickness.
Altitude: relation between decreasing barometric pressure and PO2 and levels for athletic training. Broken arrow: altitude sickness possible in the unacclimatized.

altitude

the height above sea level. As atmospheric (barometric) pressure decreases progressively with increasing altitude, from the standard 1 atmosphere at sea level, the partial pressure of oxygen (PO2) decreases proportionately; the air still contains the same ∼21% of oxygen but there are fewer molecules of oxygen per unit volume. There is also a drop in temperature and humidity, but the essential problem for human life and activity is shortage of oxygen (hypoxia).

altitude,

n pertaining to any location on earth with reference to a fixed surface point, which is usually sea level. The higher the altitude, the lower the oxygen concentration and the greater the ultraviolet radiation, both of which can cause health problems.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thrombosis as a complication of extended stay at high altitude.
The launch of Altitude virtual courses and certification programs is a response to the widespread adoption of our solutions and the increasing importance employers are placing on Altitude expertise," said Catarina Gomes, Knowledge Management and Altitude University Director.
All soldiers evacuated from altitude 8000 feet or more with major complaint of typical or atypical chest pain, alone or associated with other symptoms like shortness of breath, palpitation, headache, edema, pain epigastrium, nausea, vomiting, and dry or productive cough were included in the study.
These methods and relevant technologies are mostly used to assist with GPS navigation, flight control and portable devices to conduct high-precision altitude measurements, positioning, navigation, etc.
When high altitude disease does occur, or preexisting conditions worsen, the aetiology is of major interest.
Total sleep time (a), sleep efficiency (b), mean activity score (c), and subjective sleep quality (d) at low and moderate altitude compared to sea level.
One of the only real downsides to cruising at relatively high altitude is a normally aspirated engine's reduced power output, which can be a factor near terrain.
The chronically reduced partial pressure of oxygen requires that individuals adapt to the physiological stress produced by exposure to high altitude and these adaptations are modulated by many factors (11).
Aspetar already boasts of impressive altitude training equipment, including a purpose-built normobaric hypoxic oxygen dormitory.
The $2495 AMS-2000 Altitude Management System is a feature-rich alerter that dates back to the early 1990s--a long production run that owes to its proven reliability and straight-forward feature set.