alpha-linolenic acid


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alpha-linolenic acid

C18H30O2, an omega-3 fatty acid derived from plants, esp. seeds (canola oil, flaxseed, walnuts and pumpkins) and from some fish (salmon and mackerel).
CAS # 463-40-1
See also: acid
References in periodicals archive ?
An adequate daily intake for adults of alpha-linolenic acid has been established by the U.
89 for high intake of alpha-linolenic acid from either animal (meat or dairy) or vegetable sources, 1.
The evidence for alpha-linolenic acid isn't as compelling as it is for fish oils," says Bruce Holub of the University of Guelph in Canada.
Regular dressing is a major source of alpha-linolenic acid in the U.
Other sources of alpha-linolenic acid include unhydrogenated canola and soybean oils used in most full-fat commercial salad dressings, flaxseed, flaxseed oil and a leafy vegetable called smooth purslane, which is eaten mostly in Greece.
A secondary source of omega-3 fatty acids is alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) found in flaxseed, walnuts, and canola oil.
A new report raises questions about alpha-linolenic acid for some men.
13, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- A meta-analysis published in the recent issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition evaluates how the plant-based omega-3 fatty acid alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) offers protective effects on cardiovascular diseases (CVD).
4 g alpha-linolenic acid, an amount that satisfies the Dietary Reference Intake (DRI) values for females up to 70 years of age.
Since we are not certain what other factors influence how much EPA and DHA an individual can produce from alpha-linolenic acid, some people opt to use DHA supplements from microalgae as a simple way of insuring adequate intake.
While this study offered a hint that alpha-linolenic acid may protect against strokes, it's too early to say for sure.
Separate research studies reveal that a diet rich in the omega-3 essential fatty acid alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) can lower the risk of cardiovascular disease and sudden cardiac death