particle

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particle

 [pahr´tĭ-k'l]
an extremely small mass of material.
alpha p's see alpha particles.
beta p's see beta particles.
Dane particle an intact hepatitis B virion.
elementary particle any of the subatomic particles, including electrons, protons, neutrons, positrons, neutrinos, and muons.

par·ti·cle

(par'ti-kĕl),
1. A small piece or portion of anything.
2. An elementary particle such as a proton or electron.
[L. particula, dim. of pars, part]

particle

/par·ti·cle/ (pahr´tĭ-k'l) a tiny mass of material.
Dane particle  an intact hepatitis B viral particle.
elementary particles of mitochondria  numerous minute, club-shaped granules with spherical heads attached to the inner membrane of a mitochondrion.
viral particle , virus particle virion.

particle

[pär′tikəl]
Etymology: L, particula, small part
1 any fundamental unit of matter.
2 a minute fragment or speck.

par·ti·cle

(pahr'ti-kĕl)
1. A small piece or portion of anything.
2. An elementary particle such as a proton or electron.
[L. particula, dim. of pars, part]

par·ti·cle

(pahr'ti-kĕl)
1. A small piece or portion of anything.
2. An elementary particle such as a proton or electron.
[L. particula, dim. of pars, part]

particle,

n a small amount of material.
particle, alpha,
n (alpha ray, alpha radiation) a positively charged particulate ionizing radiation consisting of helium nuclei (two protons and two neutrons) traveling at high speeds. These rays are emitted from the nucleus of an unstable element.
particle, beta,
n (beta ray, beta radiation) a particulate ionizing radiation consisting of either negative electrons (negatrons) or positive electrons (positrons) emitted from the nucleus of an unstable element. This phenomenon is called
beta decay.

particle

an extremely small mass of material. See also alpha particles and beta particle.

elementary particle
any of the subatomic particles, including electrons, protons, neutrons, positrons, neutrinos and muons.