allyl

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Related to allylic: Allylic substitution

al·lyl

(al'il),
The monovalent radical, CH2=CHCH2-.

allyl

/al·lyl/ (al´il) a univalent radical, —CH2dbondCHCH2.

allyl

(al′ĭl) [L. allium, garlic + -yl]
C3H5; a univalent unsaturated radical found in garlic and mustard.
allylic (ă-lil′ik), adjective

allyl

a univalent organic group previously used in the manufacture of pharmaceuticals.

allyl alcohol
a potent cause of hepatic necrosis. Metabolized in the liver by alcohol dehydrogenase to acrolein, the hepatoxin.
allyl formate
has the same effect as allyl alcohol.
allyl isothiocyanate
used as a counterirritant and in the manufacture of war gases. Called also volatile oil of mustard. Occurs naturally in members of the plant family Cruciferae which cause acute indigestion in cattle.
References in periodicals archive ?
The nuclear Overhauser Effect spectroscopy (NOESY) was performed with the allylic alcohol obtained by the reduction of the corresponding ester.
22) Note that this account is not fully consistent with the idea of the true structure being a resonance hybrid, although it still is pragmatically useful for understanding the chemical properties of the allylic carbocation.
Allylic compound from a special class of polyesters are polymerized through the double bond of allyl phthalates.
Although lutein and zeaxanthin have the same number of double bonds, zeaxanthin has 11 conjugated double bonds but lutein's eleventh double bond forms a more chemically reactive allylic hydroxyl end group.
This 73rd volume in the Organic Reactions series is comprised of a single chapter that surveys the various classes of allylic (propargylic and allenic) boron reagents developed for the synthetic allylation of carbonyl compounds.
Alkenes in general are known to undergo addition reactions at lower temperatures and allylic substitution at higher temperatures.
This observation is consistent with the enormous influence of structural modification on the biological activity of the bisnaphthonquinonoid namely diospyrin (Hazra 1995), the positive contribution of an aminoacetate substituent being introduced into the allylic double bond of diospyrin.
For example, allylic sulfide (allicin) is found in bulb plants such as garlic, onions, and chives.
1999) found that the monoterpenes may undergo oxidative reactions that result in aromatic compounds, cleavage of C-C double bonds, epoxide formation, or allylic oxidation to alcohols, ketones, and aldehydes.