alloy

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Related to alloying: Alloying elements

alloy

 [al´oi]
a solid mixture of two or more metals, or of one or more metals and certain metalloids, that are mutually soluble in the molten condition.

al·loy

(al'oy),
A combination of metals formed when they are miscible in the liquid state.

alloy

[al′oi]
Etymology: Fr, aloyer, to combine metals
a mixture of two or more metals or of substances with metallic properties. Most alloys are formed by mixing molten metals that dissolve in each other. A number of alloys have medical applications, such as those used for prostheses and in dental amalgams.

alloy

A substance having metallic properties and being composed of two or more chemical elements, at least one of which is a metal.

al·loy

(al'oy)
A substance composed of a mixture of two or more metals.

al·loy

(al'oy)
A combination of metals formed when they are miscible in the liquid state.
References in periodicals archive ?
Another alloying technology that continues to spread across a wide range of polymers--thermoplastics and thermosets--is interpenetrating polymer networks or IPNs (see PT, Aug.
A typical IPN profile is the alloying of a glassy polymer and an elastomer, such as in certain grades of Shell Chemical's Kraton thermoplastic rubber alloys.
There is a wide variety of opinion on the question of post-consumer/post-industrial resin recycling and the impact it will have on alloying technology.
Senkler adds the strength of resin producers lies in their "wealth of knowledge" in the art and science of alloying.
Indiscriminate use of this alloying element, however, is discouraged and could lead to excessive hardness, low strength and machining problems.
Many researchers promote using Cu in combination with other alloys such as Sn, Cr, Mo, Ni and V, creating a synergistic effect of the various alloying combination that is over and above the additive effects of the individual alloys.
New alloying technology to compatibilize thermoset rubbers and other unnamed polymers into ABS, as well as new monomers and random copolymers will be the keys, she says.
Alloying is also a new focus of interest in styrene maleic anhydride (SMA) copolymers, owing to its utility as a compatibilizer to alloy other polymers.
The research work of the Council, much of which is still in development, is intended to provide a more systematic, quantitative approach to the alloying process.
The Council's study also found that a twin-screw extruder was more effective than a batch mixer in alloying materials.
However, the presence of alloying elements affects the speed and temperature of this reaction.
The effects of a variety of alloying agents also were the subject of various papers from the Cast Iron Div this year.