allowable error

allowable error

the amount of error that can be tolerated without invalidating the medical usefulness of the analytic result. Allowable error has a 95% limit of analytic error; only 1 sample in 20 can have an error greater than this limit.

allowable error

Allowable analytical error Statistics A systemic error that is 'acceptable', both statistically and analytically–eg, 95% limit of error. See Standard deviation.
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In CAP surveys, the total allowable error is currently set at 6% (previously, at 7%; it is projected to be brought down to 5% in the near future).
The next step is to find the Total Allowable Error (TEa) for ceramic.
Other additives must be controlled within a precise range, with very little allowable error, either over or under, to produce an on-specification product.
Total allowable error for the prothrombin time is 5.
This is important because, "Recently, the FDA petitioned the International Organization for Standardization to change the allowable error rate for BGMs, currently at plus or minus 20 percent, to be more accurate.
The centre of the connective part must fall into the zone of allowable error, which is defined by the clearance between the assembled parts, the size of the chamfers and the axial tilt angle.
Key elements of the a PWS include a statement of the required services, where performance is to take place, the period of performance, measurable performance standards, and the acceptable quality level or allowable error rate (Defense Logistics Agency [DLA], 2004, pp.
To meet allowable error limit under ISO-defined disturbance levels, installation piping such as straight lengths of pipe upstream and/or downstream of the meter, and/or type and location of flow conditioner required must be considered.
Given an allowable error of 5 percent (that would accurately assess the risk of 95 percent of persons tested), two of the machines (Eastman Kodak's "ektachem DT-60" and Abbott Laboratories "Vision") were well within the limit, whereas three others were not.
Modern laboratories now base their QC design upon their bias, imprecision, and selected total allowable error for each analyte.
We used the intermeasurement CV (inter-MP CV) after calibration with the cRMs, the recovery of the value assigned with the cRMP, and the proportion of results within total allowable error (TEa) as parameters to estimate the success of harmonization.