allostasis


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al·lo·sta·sis

(al-ō-stā'sis),
In endocrinology, a chronic state of disordered homeostasis (dyshomestasis) that allows survival of the organism at the expense of its well-being and life expectancy.
[allo + [homeo]stasis]

al·lo·sta·sis

(al-ō-stā'sis)
The process of achieving equilibrium through fluctuating neuroendocrine responses to physical and psychological stressors.
See also: allostatic load
[G. allos, other, + stasis, a standing]

allostasis

(ă-los′-tă-sĭs)
Physiological adaptation to stress.
References in periodicals archive ?
18) It is a concept that refers to the "wear and tear" of allostasis (the body's protective stress response) on the body.
Allostasis is the ability to maintain the dynamic stability of the physiological systems facing a constantly changing environment (environmental stress or allostatic load).
This dysfunction is one characteristic symptom of allostasis.
In fact, the principle of allostasis, which plays a central role in Koob and LeMoal's (2001) theories on addiction also plays an integral role in McEwen and Wingfield's (2010) and other scientists' perspectives on the development of stress-related mood and anxiety disorders.
McEwen, "Stress, Adaptation, and Disease: Allostasis and Allostatic Load," Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 840 (1998): 33-44: and "Sleep Deprivation as a Neurobiologic and Physiological Stressor: Allostasis and Allostatic Load.
4) According to the theory of allostasis, the vulnerability and total damage caused to person who is exposed to stress is a combination of past traumatic experiences and the current traumatic conditions (1) stress load.
Allostasis was suggested as an alternative to homeostasis when
Chronic stress, however, can cause the body to maintain a different baseline state, called allostasis, Dr.
Allostasis is beneficial in the sense of self-preservation, but if taken to an extreme, it begins to tear down the body's defenses and leaves the door open for illness.
Excessive ethanol drinking following a history of dependence: Animal model of allostasis.
As McEwen later described it, allostatic load is "the price the body pays for being forced to adapt to adverse psychosocial or physical situations, and it represents either the presence of too much allostasis or the inefficient operation of the allostasis response systems, which must be turned on and then turned off again after the stressful situation is over.