allometric growth

allometric growth

the increase in size of different organs or parts of an organism at various rates. Also called heterauxesis. Compare isometric growth. See also allometry.

allometric growth

  1. unequal growth rate in different portions of the body of an organism that gives rise to the final shape.
  2. growth of a particular structure at a constantly greater rate than the whole.
References in periodicals archive ?
Allometric growth of the flowers in five genera of the Marantaceae and in Canna (Cannaceae).
The Texas urban hierarchy grows under the law of allometric growth which is to say that the rate of growth of an individual city within the system is proportional to that of the system as a whole.
The Texas urban hierarchy grows under the law of allometric growth, which is to say that the rate of growth of an individual city within the system is proportional to that of the system as a whole.
Allometric growth leading to relatively longer legs only takes place in males and mainly during the final molt supporting an evolutionary hypothesis of leg elongation in males rather than leg shorting in females due to burrowing behavior.
The results indicate the size structure from Bahia Magdalena has a unimodal shape and shows negative allometric growth in the relationship between shell length and total weight (b = 2.
The assumption of the allometric smoothing function was to have a common tangent at the inflection point to reflect the variable allometric growth smoothly.
Results show that the jumbo squid has a predominantly positive allometric growth pattern (coefficient b, >3), and the condition factor most effective for this species was Fulton's coefficient (K).
By truncating the application of our growth model at the approximate minimum size of fish caught by the Hawaii-based longline fishery (60-cm EFL), we eliminate the markedly allometric growth effects that half-year-old and younger fish have on the ascending limb of the VBGF curve.
For example, Uneputty (2007) used operculum length and width to demonstrate allometric growth in the tropical marine snail Nerita undata, and Vermeij and Williams (2007) contrasted maximum operculum diameter and thickness by species to predict successfully the large-scale spatial distribution of turban snails (Turbinidae).
In some Crustacea (once again, not lobsters, as far as is known), allometries are not fixed at the pubertal molt; and, in a minority of these, allometric growth is seasonally cyclic and allometries disappear when mature instars molt during nonreproductive periods (Hartnoll, 1974, 1982).
Our study documents for the first time the size at sexual maturity, sexual dimorphism, and allometric growth relative to carapace width for certain secondary sexual characters in male and female M.