alloimmunization


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al·lo·im·mu·ni·za·tion

(al-lō'im-myū'nī-zā'shŭn),
Immunization against a non-self protein, as occurs in patients receiving transfusions.

alloimmunization

/al·lo·im·mu·ni·za·tion/ (-im″u-nĭ-za´shun) an immune response generated in an individual or strain of one species by an alloantigen from a different individual or strain of the same species.

al·lo·im·mu·ni·za·tion

(al-lō'im-myū'nī-zā'shŭn)
Immunization against a non-self protein, as occurs in patients receiving transfusions.

alloimmunization

development of antibodies in response to alloantigens; antigens derived from a genetically dissimilar animal of the same species. See also alloantigen.

alloimmunization of pregnancy
sensitization of the dam against fetal red blood cell antigens that leak into the maternal circulation across the placenta or during parturition is uncommon except in the mare and sow where it gives rise to alloimmune hemolytic anemia of the newborn.
References in periodicals archive ?
Studies report that the prevalence of alloimmunization in chronically transfused patients may be as high as 60 percent.
Hydrops Fetalis Caused by Homozygous [eth]-Thalassemia and Rh Antigen Alloimmunization.
The rate of alloimmunization is variable and depends on the frequency of the antigens in the population and on their immunogenicity.
Although blood transfusion is generally safe, alloimmunization (when an antibody is formed in response to an antigen that is not present on a person's own red blood cells RBCs ) remains a dreaded complication, particularly in patients with sickle cell diseases.
Second, alloimmunization may go undetected owing to a lack of routine follow-up testing after transfusion.
On rare occasions, alloimmunization due to minor erythrocyte antigens may cause severe hemolytic disease requiring exchange transfusion.
SDP that are HLA matched are indicated for patients with a known history of alloimmunization (3).
15) However, the risk of allogeneic transfusions extend beyond viral transmission and include allergy, alloimmunization, bacterial sepsis, graft versus host disease (GVHD), transfusion associated lung injury (TRAILI), volume overload, and immunosuppression.
The natural history of fetomaternal alloimmunization to the platelet-specific antigen HPA-1a (PIA1, Zwa) as determined by antenatal screening.
Anne Boleyn's pregnancies were a textbook example of Kell alloimmunization with a healthy first child and subsequent late-term miscarriages.
The increased need for platelets may indicate he is becoming refractory from human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alloimmunization (Eisenberg, 2010).
Finally, there is the concept of alloimmunization, with the possibility that fetal antigens shared by tumor cells stimulate an immune response in the mother.