allocation

(redirected from allocative)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia.

allocation

The designed or intended distribution of a thing, typically used in the context of patient assignment to a particular arm in a clinical trial.

allocation

Vox populi The distribution of a thing. See Nonrandomized allocation, Resource allocation.

allocation

(al″ŏ-kā′-shŏn)
The assignment or distribution of assets or duties.

allocation

the technique of forming groups in a population for the purpose of carrying out comparisons between them. The objective is to create comparable groups and to avoid bias. Techniques used include random allocation, self-selection or clinical judgment.
References in periodicals archive ?
Based on result of analysis in cacao+coconut+patchouli (KKN) intercropping farm, it concluded that efficiency in technical, allocative and economic was high and feasible to work.
Yet, it is only under the full multilateral trade liberalization scenario CCMULTI that the allocative efficiency gains are large enough to offset the negative impact of climate change as captured by the technical efficiency effects.
99 implies that 99% of the variations in the cost of production of groundnut in Benue State are accounted for by differences in allocative efficiency of farmers.
superior to government in one important allocative sense: it would
For the same reason, ASA increases the liquidity of spectrum markets and therefore allows for substantial improvements in allocative efficiency relative to both traditional trading/leasing and unlicensed/hybrid models.
After the obtaining the cost efficiency, one can then calculate the allocative efficiency (AE) by dividing the technical efficiency from the cost efficiency as shown in (Eq.
Decomposing cost efficiency into its components, we find that allocative inefficiency is the primary source of cost inefficiency.
Thanks to the authoritative and allocative resources offered by accounting, it is used as an important source for evaluating the performance of individuals and entities.
Also Rawls has always distinguished between allocative and distributive justice.
Allocative efficiency is defined as a ratio of cost efficiency score to technical efficiency score.
As we state in main body of the article, the general knowledge that there will be an allocative cost in addition to the Harberger triangle is well known--indeed, it is discussed in some popular introductory texts.
2 While this statement might be perceived as naive, simplistic and in contra-mention of the accepted benefits of progress and innovation, the act remains that: (1) the negative externalities of the complex financial structures under the guise of innovation have done insurmountable damage to the lotion of confidence in the allocative efficiency of the financial system, and (2) with the drying up of wholesale funding sources and trading avenues for securitization instruments, varies efforts to revive the financial system have focused on a back to basics approach.