alliteration

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al·lit·er·a·tion

(ă-lit-er-ā'shŭn),
In psychiatry, a speech disturbance in which words commencing with the same sounds, usually consonants, are notably frequent.
[Fr. allitération, fr. L. ad, to, + littera, letter of alphabet]

alliteration

(ă-lit″ĕ-rā′shŏn) [L. alliteratio]
A speech disorder in which words beginning with the same consonant sound are used to excess.
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References in periodicals archive ?
These concerns have been front and center in scholarly works at least since William Roff's 1982 seminal study on Southeast Asia (with its similarly alliterative title, "Sanitation and Security: The Imperial Powers and the Nineteenth Century Hajj").
With phrases like 'soccer school' or 'soccer skills', it is pure alliterative pleasure driving its usage.
9 A short poem which is alliterative and very difficult to say quickly is known as a tongue .
1It's Glorious Alone among racecourses in having an alliterative epithet tacked to its name as a matter of course, Glorious Goodwood really is glorious.
The final essay in this section, Karen Cherewatuk's "Dying in Uncle Arthur's Arms and at his Hands," examines the alliterative Morte Arthure.
Well, this is the kind of alliterative term I always enjoy.
Lister's writing is stylistically fresh, frequently alliterative, and distinctive.
l Drink whenever Craig comes out with an alliterative piece of criticism like "lame, laboured and limp" or "d-ar-nce dis-ar-ster".
Continuing Ubuntu's penchant for daft, alliterative names, 9.
To be fair, there was some entertainment value to be had from watching Coren regurgitate curdled Bailey's after one too many Cement Mixer cocktails (a single shot being one too many for his delicate tastes) and a genuine eye-opener from Dr Duncan Diamond--apparently a real physician, not the alliterative alter ego of a comic-book superhero--about just how much stress drinking coffee puts on your heart.
Alliterative word play coupled with gay male sexual encounters and passages devoted to Jarman's films takes this collection beyond beautiful gestures and into a powerful and highly original consideration of Canadian gay male poetry: "dry-fucking the boy next/ to you caused pain to pearl/ the back of ferns, peers/ to savage the two/ of you like rabid dogs/ and the sky to fall.
In chapter ten Scattergood returns to issues of ownership and circulation of medieval manuscripts in a fascinating analysis of the connection(s) between the Massy family of Cheshire and the writing of Middle English alliterative poetry (Sir Gawain and the Green Knight and the alliterative St Erkenwald in BL MS Harley 2250).