alliteration

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al·lit·er·a·tion

(ă-lit-er-ā'shŭn),
In psychiatry, a speech disturbance in which words commencing with the same sounds, usually consonants, are notably frequent.
[Fr. allitération, fr. L. ad, to, + littera, letter of alphabet]

alliteration

(ă-lit″ĕ-rā′shŏn) [L. alliteratio]
A speech disorder in which words beginning with the same consonant sound are used to excess.
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References in periodicals archive ?
contains]]d, which alliterates beautifully with wd[[contains].
Moreover, the first stressed syllable of the second stave in each line--"pride's" in line 286 and "praise" in line 287-directs the alliteration in each line ("proud," "princely," and "pride's" in line 286; and "princedom," "passed," and praise in line 287); and the fourth stressed syllable in each line does not alliterate with the other stressed sounds.
In the etymological origins of the non-line-end stressed words that alliterate, statistics show no significant difference between Pearl and the long-line poems.
In this set of correlations the semiotic relation between the letters and the concepts must be considered indexical: the words cannot be icons because they do not alliterate and do not therefore "participate" in the reality they purport to denote.
618-19]) and at times even to pairs that only alliterate.
Smart (Johnson's friend) alliterates with Swift; Clare provides an internal rhyme with Baudelaire.
He also does something in this verse that belongs to translating practice of the most conventional late modern kind: where Plautus alliterates maximum meretricibus, Zukofsky answers with "profit in prostitutes," thus reproducing the effect of alliteration while substituting a different consonantal sound that allows him to render the senses of quaestum and meretricibus with semantic fidelity.
In addition, he deals too slightly with the difficulty provided by verse-initial finite verbs, choosing simply to stress the verb when it alliterates, and ignoring it when it fails to do so.
Indeed, it seems as if for over a century every new phonological theory has been associated with claims that a level (or levels) of representation posited by that theory functions uniquely in the poetic systems of all languages: it is that level which the rules of versification "look at" to determine whether and how any particular sound or stretch rhymes, alliterates, scans, etc.
It is, of course, hard to disprove such a statement; but it should be noted that the fronted finite verb gemealt in (18c) has primary stress, since it alliterates with modsefa and moeges.
But the reader for MAE, notes that |the last stave of the third line alliterates, which in unrhymed alliterative verse it should not do: it is thus unlikely to come from a literary work' i.
Director Tony Ward, who set up the firm with Steve Merchant in 2009, said: "We called the horse mannequin 'Randy', as it alliterates with 'rescue',' though in Australia he has a variety of names including 'Bruce.