alligator forceps


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forceps

 [for´seps] (L.)
a two-bladed instrument with a handle, used for compressing or grasping tissues in surgical operations, handling sterile dressings, and other purposes.
alligator forceps a grasping forceps with a scissorlike handle and blades opening in a vertical plane similar to the jaws of an alligator.
bayonet forceps a forceps whose blades are offset from the axis of the handle.
capsule forceps a forceps for removing the lens capsule in cataract.
Chamberlen forceps the original form of obstetric forceps, invented in the sixteenth century.
clamp forceps a forceps-like clamp with an automatic lock, for compressing arteries or other structures.
dressing forceps forceps with scissor-like handles for grasping lint, drainage tubes, etc., in dressing wounds.
Magill forceps forceps used to introduce an endotracheal tube into the trachea during nasotracheal intubation.
obstetric forceps forceps for extracting the fetal head from the maternal passages.
Obstetric forceps and their application. From McKinney et al., 2000.
rongeur forceps a forceps designed for use in cutting bone.
thumb forceps a forceps with serrated blades and with or without teeth.
tissue forceps a forceps without teeth or with one or more small teeth at the end of each blade, designed for handling tissues with minimal trauma during surgery.

al·li·ga·tor for·ceps

a long forceps with a small hinged jaw on the end.

alligator forceps

(ăl′ĭ-gā′tər)
n.
Long forceps with a small hinged jaw on the end.

alligator forceps

a forceps with long, thin, angular handles and heavy interlocking teeth; used in a variety of surgeries including orthopedics and ear, nose and throat procedures. Also called alligator clamp.
Strong toothed forceps with a double clamp, used to retrieve stents and stones and in orthopaedic surgery

alligator forceps

Alligators Surgery A type of forceps with sharp teeth

al·li·ga·tor for·ceps

(al'i-gā-tŏr fōr'seps)
A long forceps with a small hinged jaw on the end.

forceps

pl. forcipes [L.] a two-bladed instrument with a handle for compressing or grasping tissues in surgical operations, and for handling sterile dressings, etc.

alligator forceps
strong toothed forceps having a double clamp. Long-handled with short jaws at the end of a long shank. Designed for grasping in an enclosed space, e.g. removing grass seeds from ear canals.
bayonet forceps
a forceps whose blades are offset from the axis of the handle.
bone-cutting forceps
have cutting blades and may be double-action.
bone-holding forceps
designed to grip bones or fragments.
capsule forceps
a forceps for removing the lens capsule in cataract.
clamp forceps
a forceps-like clamp with an automatic lock, for compressing arteries, etc.
dressing forceps
finger- and thumb-operated spring forceps used for general grasping of tissues, dressings; there is a great variety of tips available to the blades. Called also thumb forceps.
grasping forceps
includes tissue, sponge, towel, vulsellum forceps.
hemostatic forceps
used to clamp the ends of vessels and establish hemostasis or to cross clamp a vascular pedicle. See also crile hemostatic forceps, halsted mosquito forceps, kelly-murphy forceps, rochester-carmalt forceps.
obstetric forceps
forceps for extracting the fetal head from the maternal passages.
rongeur forceps
a forceps designed for use in cutting bone.
sponge forceps
thumb forceps
for holding tissue with the left hand while using another instrument in the right hand (or vice versa for the sinistral surgeon). Called also tissue forceps.
tissue forceps
includes adson tissue forceps, alligator forceps (see above), allis tissue forceps, babcock forceps, knowles forceps, rightangle forceps, vulsella.
towel forceps
spring clips with middle crossover and spring at end. Inward curving, sharp pointed tips. Used to fix drapes to tissue with minimal trauma. Also usable as light tissue forceps or rib approximators in small animals.
transfer forceps
a sterile grasping instrument, used to move surgical instruments, blades, needles and suture material to the instrument table at surgery.