allergist


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allergist

 [al´er-jist]
a physician specializing in the diagnosis and treatment of allergic conditions.

al·ler·gist

(al'er-jist),
One who specializes in the treatment of allergies.

allergist

(ăl′ər-jĭst)
n.
A physician specializing in the diagnosis and treatment of allergies.

allergist

[al′ərjist]
a physician who specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of allergic disorders.

allergist

A physician who is often trained in both internal medicine and clinical immunology, and manages patients with allergies; allergists specialise in allergy-induced asthma, stings, bites and sinusitis.

allergist

Immunology A physician, who is often trained in both internal medicine and clinical immunology and who manages Pts with allergies Meat & potatoes diseases Allergy-induced asthma, stings, bites, sinusitis Salary $137K + 12% bonus

al·ler·gist

(al'ĕr-jist)
A health care specialist in the treatment of allergies.
References in periodicals archive ?
Out of a total of 3,063 patients with a CRS diagnosis from primary care physicians, 662 were referred to otolaryngologists and 309 were referred to allergists.
Mary Jelks, a prominent Florida allergist, points out, "There are still a lot of puzzle pieces to put together; once we do that, we'll know more.
ACI recommends speaking with your board-certified allergist about treatment options and for tips on how to eliminate allergy triggers in your home environment.
Allergists say the most important treatments for allergies are prevention and proper medicine.
For more information about allergies or about becoming an allergist, visit this Web site: http://allergy.
It is important that physicians who believe their patient is suffering from allergies refer them to a board-certified allergist for testing and treatment," said Dr.
Dietary introduction of baked egg by an allergist can broaden a child's diet, improve quality of life and likely accelerate the development of an egg tolerance," she suggested.
According to guidelines issued by the Joint Council of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology, all patients treated for anaphylaxis should receive a prescription for subcutaneous epinephrine and a referral to an allergist.
According to rough estimates by allergists at the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) Annual Scientific Meeting, spice allergy is responsible for 2 percent of food allergies.
Jacob Offenberger, a Granada Hills and Northridge Hospital allergist staring at a blur of leaves streaming by his third-story allergy-center window.
Only 2% of the physicians said that they would refer the patient to an allergist.
Eriksson, a retired Swedish food allergist associated with County Hospital in Halmstad.