benzene

(redirected from alkylbenzene)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

benzene

 [ben´zēn]
a liquid hydrocarbon, C6H6, obtained mainly as a byproduct of the destructive distillation of coal, used as a solvent. It is irritant, toxic, and carcinogenic.
benzene hexachloride (BHC) a chlorinated hydrocarbon; one isomer, gamma benzene hexachloride (lindane) is used as an insecticide, to kill lice.

ben·zene

(ben'zēn), Do not confuse this word with benzine.
The basic six-carbon ring structure in most aromatic compounds; a highly toxic hydrocarbon from light coal tar oil; used as a solvent.
Synonym(s): benzol, coal tar naphtha
[benzoin, + -ene]

benzene

/ben·zene/ (ben´zēn) a liquid hydrocarbon, C6H6, from coal tar; used as a solvent. It is toxic by transdermal absorption, ingestion, or inhalation; chronic exposure may cause bone marrow depression and aplasia and leukemia.
benzene hexachloride  (BHC) a chlorinated hydrocarbon, C6H6Cl6, having numerous isomers; the gamma isomer is lindane.

benzene

(bĕn′zēn′, bĕn-zēn′)
n.
A colorless, flammable, toxic, liquid aromatic hydrocarbon, C6H6, derived from petroleum and used in or to manufacture a wide variety of chemical products, including DDT, detergents, insecticides, and motor fuels. Also called benzol.

benzene

[ben′zēn]
a colorless, highly flammable liquid hydrocarbon (C6H6) originally derived by fractional distillation of coal tar. It is now derived by catalytic reforming during petroleum refining. The prototypical aromatic compound, it is used in the production of various organic compounds, including pharmaceuticals.

benzene

A volatile, flammable hydrocarbon by-product of destructive coal distillation, which is present in coal tar; it is the simplest aromatic compound. Benzene is an organic solvent, and is both toxic—in particular to mucocutaneous surfaces—and carcinogenic; chronic exposure to benzene is linked to bone marrow depression, aplastic anaemia, and acute myelogenous leukaemia, one-fourth of which are preceded by pancytopenia and/or peripheral neuropathies.

Benzene

A colorless volatile flammable toxic liquid hydrocarbon used as a solvent and as a motor fuel.
Mentioned in: Myelofibrosis

benzene

a liquid hydrocarbon, C6H6, from coal tar; used as a solvent.

benzene hexachloride
a chlorinated hydrocarbon. The gamma isomer was used extensively as an insecticide. Called also Gammexane, lindane.
benzene hexachloride poisoning
benzene ring
the closed hexagon of carbon atoms in benzene, from which the different benzene compounds are derived by replacement of the hydrogen atoms.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mineral oils and alkylbenzene lubricants were most stable in C[O.
This finding is in accordance with the fact that the same dependences were detected both in cases of polar and nonpolar phases and also in the cases of alkylphenols and alkylbenzenes, because retention data and their changes are in the given case related with intermolecular forces rather than with the structure of the considered compounds.
vancouver Island Transmission Reinforcement Project Technical Data Report: Potential Effects of Alkylbenzene Release to the Marine Environment.
Pathomorphological changes in the gills of fish fingerlings (Cirrhina mingala) by lineal alkylbenzene sulfonate.
The article, "Environmental Safety of the Use of Major Surfactant Classes in North America," brings together over 250 published and unpublished studies on the environmental properties, fate and toxicity of the four major, high-volume surfactant classes and relevant feedstocks: alcohol sulfate (AS), alcohol ethoxysulfate (AES), linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS), alcohol ethoxylate (AE), and long-chain alcohol (LCOH).
Particular emphasis is placed on the main application areas of benzene: ethylbenzene, cumene, cyclohexane, alkylbenzene, and nitrobenzene.
199B, "Alkylbenzenes for Split Air-Conditioners with R410A", Proceedings of the 1st Alkylbenzene Conference, West Lafayette, Indiana, July 18.
2001) used a form of the Andrews equation (often used to describe microbial growth with inhibition) to model the effect of cadmium, zinc, and nickel on rates of alkylbenzene biodegradation
The specific end-use segments discussed are Ethylbenzene & Styrene Industry, Cumene for the Phenolics Industry, Nitrobenzene for the Aniline Industry, Alkylbenzene, Others.
Using palm oil, Lion chemists developed a methyl ester sulphonate that eliminates these odors better than alcohol ethoxysulfates or linear alkylbenzene sulfonate.