alkalosis


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Related to alkalosis: metabolic acidosis, metabolic alkalosis, respiratory alkalosis

al·ka·lo·sis

(al-kă-lō'sis), Do not confuse this word with ankylosis.
A state characterized by a decrease in the hydrogen ion concentration of arterial blood below the normal level, 40 nmol/L, or pH over 7.4. The condition may be caused by an increase in the concentration of alkaline compounds, or by a decrease in the concentration of acidic compounds or carbon dioxide.

alkalosis

/al·ka·lo·sis/ (al″kah-lo´sis) a pathologic condition due to accumulation of base in, or loss of acid from, the body. Cf. acidosis. alkalot´ic
altitude alkalosis  increased alkalinity in blood and tissues due to exposure to high altitudes.
compensated alkalosis  a form in which compensatory mechanisms have returned the pH toward normal.
hypochloremic alkalosis  metabolic alkalosis marked by hypochloremia together with hyponatremia and hypokalemia, resulting from the loss of sodium chloride and hydrochloric acid due to prolonged vomiting.
hypokalemic alkalosis  metabolic alkalosis associated with a low serum potassium level.
metabolic alkalosis  a disturbance in which the acid-base status shifts toward the alkaline side because of retention of base or loss of noncarbonic, or fixed (nonvolatile), acids.
respiratory alkalosis  a state due to excess loss of carbon dioxide from the body, usually as a result of hyperventilation.

alkalosis

(ăl′kə-lō′sĭs)
n.
1. Abnormally high alkalinity of the blood and body tissues caused by an excess of bicarbonates, as from an increase in alkali intake, or by or a deficiency of acids other than carbonic acid, as from vomiting. Also called metabolic alkalosis.
2. Abnormally high alkalinity of the blood and body tissues caused by a deficiency of carbon dioxide due to hyperventilation. Also called respiratory alkalosis.

al′ka·lot′ic (-lŏt′ĭk) adj.

alkalosis

[al′kəlō′sis]
Etymology: Ar, al + galiy + Gk, osis, condition
an abnormal condition of body fluids, characterized by a tendency toward a blood pH level greater than 7.45 caused by an excess of alkaline bicarbonate or a deficiency of acid. There are two types: respiratory alkalosis and metabolic alkalosis. When a buffer system, such as carbon dioxide retention or bicarbonate excretion, prevents a shift in pH, it is labeled compensated alkalosis. The treatment of uncompensated alkalosis involves the correction of dehydration and various ionic deficits to restore the normal acid-base balance in which the ratio of carbonic acid to bicarbonate is 20:1. Compare acidosis.

alkalosis

Pathophysiology A clinical state due to either an accumulation of bases or loss of acids–↓ H+, resulting in ↑ pH. See Contraction alkalosis, Metabolic acidosis, Respiratory alkalosis. Cf Acidosis.

al·ka·lo·sis

(al-kă-lō'sis)
A state characterized by a decrease in the hydrogen ion concentration of arterial blood below the normal level, 40 nmol/L, or pH over 7.45. The condition may be caused by H-ion loss or base excess in body fluids (metabolic alkalosis), or caused by CO2 loss due to hyperventilation (respiratory alkalosis).

alkalosis

An abnormal degree of alkalinity of the blood, usually due to loss of acid by prolonged vomiting or to hysterical over-breathing with abnormal loss of carbon dioxide.

alkalosis

the state in which there is excessive body alkalinity.

Alkalosis

A condition of the blood and other body fluids in which bicarbonate levels are higher than normal.
Mentioned in: Urinalysis

alkalosis

condition following increase in pH of body fluids, from accumulation of base or depletion of acid. metabolic alkalosis is associated with loss of gastric acid with excessive vomiting, and respiratory alkalosis with excessive loss of carbon dioxide due to hyperventilation from any cause, including the physiological response to hypoxia at high altitude. In compensated alkalosis pH may be normal, with a low blood bicarbonate concentration (due to increased renal excretion) when the cause is respiratory, or with a raised blood carbon dioxide (due to hypoventilation) when the cause is metabolic. See also acid-base balance.

alkalosis

pathophysical disorder characterized by hydrogen (H+) ion loss or base (OH-) excess, so that the tissue pH can no longer be maintained at 7.4

al·ka·lo·sis

(al-kă-lō'sis) Do not confuse this word with ankylosis.
A state characterized by a decrease in the hydrogen ion concentration of arterial blood below the normal level, 40 nmol/L, or pH over 7.4.

alkalosis (alkəlō´sis),

n a disturbance of acid-base balance and water balance, characterized by an excess of alkali or a deficiency of acids.
alkalosis, compensated,
n a condition in which the blood bicarbonate is usually higher than normal but compensatory mechanisms have kept the pH level within normal range. See also alkalosis, uncompensated.
alkalosis, hypochloremic,
n a metabolic abnormality caused by an increase in blood bicarbonate after significant chloride loss.
alkalosis, respiratory,
n alkalemia produced by hypoventilation. Plasma bicarbonate is therefore decreased in respiratory alkalosis but raised in metabolic alkalosis.
alkalosis, uncompensated,
n alkalemia usually accompanied by an increased blood bicarbonate.

alkalosis

a pathological condition resulting from accumulation of base, or from loss of acid without comparable loss of base in the body fluids, and characterized by decrease in hydrogen ion concentration (increase in pH). Alkalosis is the opposite of acidosis. See also acid-base balance.

compensated alkalosis
a condition in which compensatory mechanisms have returned the pH toward normal.
concentration alkalosis
associated with deficit in free body water, hypotonic fluid losses or increased sodium levels.
gastric alkalosis
alkalosis due to loss of gastric fluid because of persistent vomiting. See also hypochloremic alkalosis (below).
hypochloremic alkalosis
a metabolic alkalosis in which gastric losses of chloride are disproportionately greater than sodium loss because of corresponding increase in potassium loss.
hypokalemic alkalosis
a metabolic alkalosis associated with a low serum potassium level; retention of alkali or loss of acid occurs in the extracellular (but not intracellular) fluid compartment; although the pH of the intracellular fluid may be below normal.
metabolic alkalosis
a disturbance in which the acid-base status shifts toward the alkaline because of uncompensated loss of acids, ingestion or retention of excess base, or potassium depletion. The condition can occur with vomiting or accompany treatment with diuretics.
respiratory alkalosis
reduced carbon dioxide tension in the extracellular fluid caused by excessive excretion of carbon dioxide through the lungs (hyperventilation). Conditions commonly associated with respiratory alkalosis include pain, hypoxia, fever, high environmental temperature, poisoning, early pulmonary edema, pulmonary embolism and central nervous system disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hypokalemia, metabolic alkalosis, and hypernatremia due to "massive" sodium penicillin therapy.
On the generation, maintenance, and correction of metabolic alkalosis.
Thus, the ultimate acid-base effect of hyperaldosteronism is to cause metabolic alkalosis and hypokalemia.
The main side-effects of citrate described in the literature are metabolic acidosis due to impaired citrate metabolism because of liver failure or hypoxaemia or metabolic alkalosis due to increased citrate metabolism.
Metabolic alkalosis is a common condition in hospitalized patients.
Hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis may result from loss of chloride in excess of sodium loss, usually from abnormal loss of gastric fluid.
We conclude that, unlike the AG, the SIG is not affected by severe respiratory acidosis and alkalosis, enhancing its utility in acid-base disturbances.
Routine laboratory evaluation revealed an anion gap metabolic acidosis (anion gap of 23) and respiratory alkalosis, in the absence of a potential bicarbonate (pH, 7.
For instance, in persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn, pulmonary artery pressures can be lowered by either respiratory or metabolic alkalosis [18].
Failure to account for this difference when determining their dosage can result in metabolic alkalosis, a condition caused by excessive levels of bicarbonate in the blood, and which can result in catastrophic heart events in dialysis patients.
The most likely cause of the acute respiratory alkalosis and hyperventilation is hypoxemia.
The only initial area of concern was that tonic-clonic movements were observed in a few patients in association with respiratory alkalosis and deep anaesthesia.