reserve

(redirected from alkali reserve, alkaline reserve)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

reserve

 [re-zerv´]
1. to hold back for future use.
2. a supply beyond that ordinarily used, for use in an emergency.
alkali reserve (alkaline reserve) see alkali reserve.
cardiac reserve an increase in cardiac output related to an increase in heart rate or stroke volume to meet body requirements.

re·serve

(rĕ-zĕrv'),
Something available but held back for later use, as strength or carbohydrates.
[L. re-servo, to keep back, reserve]

reserve

/re·serve/ (re-zerv´)
1. to hold back for future use.
2. a supply, beyond that ordinarily used, which may be utilized in emergency.

alkali reserve , alkaline reserve the amount of conjugate base components of the blood buffers, the most important being bicarbonate.
cardiac reserve  potential ability of the heart to perform work beyond that necessary under basal conditions.
ovarian reserve  the number and quality of oocytes in the ovaries of a woman of childbearing age.

reserve

[rizurv′]
Etymology: L, reservare, to save
a potential capacity to maintain vital body functions in homeostasis by adjusting to increased need, such as cardiac reserve, pulmonary reserve, and alkali reserve. See also homeostasis.

reserve

Physiology A capacity or capability to be used in an emergency. See Cardiac reserve, Coronary vasodilator reserve, Resistance reserve.

re·serve

(rē-zĕrv')
Something available but held back for later use.
[L. re-servo, to keep back, reserve]

re·serve

(rē-zĕrv')
Something available but held back for later use.

reserve,

n something kept in store for future use.
reserve, alkali,
n See reserve, alkaline.
reserve, alkaline,
n (alkali reserve), 1. the amount of buffer compounds (e.g., sodium bicarbonate, dipotassium phosphate, proteins) in the blood capable of neutralizing acids; one of the buffer systems of the blood that can neutralize the acid valences formed in the body. It is made up of the base of weak acid salts and is usually measured by determining the bicarbonate concentration of the plasma.
n 2. the concentration of bicarbonate ions (HCO3) in the blood. These ions serve as a reserve in that they may be displaced by anions (e.g., Cl, SO4−2, PO4−3). Displacement of bicarbonate ions occurs mainly by means of the chloride shift. The role of the buffer system is such that a large influx of acid or base ions from either metabolic function or ingestion can be neutralized by the alkaline reserves from the mineral and protein salts in the blood and tissue fluids. A strong acid is transformed into a weak base. Consequently, the pH level of the blood fluctuates very little, and the tissue cells are constantly bathed in a continuously buffered solution.
reserve, cardiac,
n the reserve strength or pumping ability of the heart, which may be called on in an emergency.

reserve

1. to hold back for future use.
2. a supply, beyond that ordinarily used, that may be utilized in emergency.

alkali reserve, alkaline reserve
the amount of buffer compounds in the blood that are capable of neutralizing acids, such as sodium bicarbonate and proteins. See also alkali reserve.
cardiac reserve
the potential ability of the heart to perform work beyond that necessary under basal conditions. See also cardiac reserve.