alienist

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alienist

An obsolete term for a
(1) Psychiatrist;
(2) Forensic psychiatrist.
References in periodicals archive ?
to be introduced, as it is for an alienist to testify as to the soundness or unsoundness of the mind of a subject.
Swinburne's reviewers, however, often noted an absence of psychological "sympathy" in his poetry, reflecting what alienists understood as the cornerstone of insanity.
The alienist found the same "ideas," "errors," and "passions," in the insane, intensified only "because man displays himself in all his nakedness; dissimulating not his thoughts, nor concealing his defects" (p.
German alienist Max Nordau, in his 1895 Degeneration, classified Swinburne as a "higher degenerate" for his "false and frequently delirious" thought, the clarity of which reflected the monomaniac's logical expression of illogical ideas.
20) Smith has observed that alienists undermined their campaign for authority in the courtroom by employing "publicly accessible observations" and "commonly available criteria" in their diagnoses, which encouraged the assumption that any reasonably intelligent and observant individual could recognize insanity.
Although the prominent alienist Forbes Winslow testified that Brough was suffering from a "diseased brain," and pointed to the crime itself as ample proof of her madness -- "The act itself bears insanity stamped on its very face," he later wrote of the case -- (2) his colleague John Charles Bucknill criticized the verdict as a "legal fiction" intended to spare the life of a woman who would otherwise have hanged for her crimes.
There is no law in this state that authorizes or permits a court, either on his own motion or on motion of a party to any civil suit or proceeding, to appoint alienists to examine a defendant .
The Evening Graphic and New York Law Journal quoted in "Gray is Examined by Four Alienists," New York Times, April 15, 1927, p.
Theorists in the first period included travelers, military physicians, and alienists who examined Algerian lunatics and collectively found them less prone to madness than civilized Europeans.
When the French alienist, Jean-Pierre Fairer (1822), asserted that "civilization plays a great role in the production of suicide," it was quite clear to his readers, particularly to other alienists, that "civilization" was synonymous with contemporary urban life.
The opinions of French, British, and American alienists about modernity and suicide were reinforced by republication and translation of each others' writings in psychiatric journals like the Annales d'hygiene publique, Annales medico-psychologiques, Asylum Journal of Mental Science, Journal of Psychological Medicine, and the American Journal of Insanity.
Indeed, bound up with the "moral treatment" was the belief, shared by French, British, and American alienists, that removal of the insane from urban to rural settings provided powerful therapeutic benefits.