alienate

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alienate

(āl′ē-ĕ-nāt″) [L. alienus, someone else's, alien]
To isolate, estrange, or dissociate.
References in periodicals archive ?
He or she will, if anything, err on the side of denial, whereas the alienating parent will not miss an opportunity to accuse the other parent.
See also a discussion of alienating mayorazgos to meet the legal requirements of returning a widow's dowry to her upon her husband's death; Beceiro Pita and Cordoba de la Llave, Parentesco, 237.
The products are proven to be very effective in dramatically increasing collection rates without alienating the client.
It might just be that Lieberman has boxed himself out of political viability, alienating the left with his public faith, and alienating the center and the right with his politics.
But it's also emblematic of ``The Beach's'' overriding failure to address its theme - the difficulty of getting real in an increasingly wired, commercialized and alienating world - in other than virtual terms itself.
Until that happens, it would be foolhardy to complete a process that may not help the college and, in fact, could do more harm by further alienating neighboring residents.
and Microsoft--at risk of alienating a $17-billion-a-year international gay travel market--said they knew nothing of Sandals' policy and severed all ties to the resort.
Carl said this is the first year the company scheduled a giant margarita-making event, but felt that setting the record was not worth alienating customers.
Ward recommended that the council accept Tyus' offer, writing that with demands for a higher payment ``there would be the risk of alienating the rank-and-file members of the department.
Tantamount to ``whistling past the graveyard,'' MLB and its primary customers have yet to adequately address these concerns, hoping they will somehow resolve themselves prior to forever damaging the game by alienating a new generation of fans.
They provide a safe meeting place for shoppers and families - and a sense of community and ``place'' for Angelenos who yearn to escape from the alienating anonymity of a drive-thru culture.
The show is divided into themes - paintings reflecting melancholy, life in the alienating city, the horrors of World War I, optimism that the leftist uprisings after the war would change things, resignation that the same old hypocrisy of bourgeois values would remain.