alienate


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alienate

(āl′ē-ĕ-nāt″) [L. alienus, someone else's, alien]
To isolate, estrange, or dissociate.
References in periodicals archive ?
99) and How To Lose Friends & Alienate People on Blu-ray (rrp pounds 24.
Clearly, a decision that would permanently alienate property in favor of a daughter making a religious profession had to be carefully monitored.
The disappointing outcomes of the Russian and German case studies suggest that a failure to maintain adequate nonviolent discipline can reduce the probability of achieving a movement's ultimate objectives because it alienates potential domestic and external supporters.
Curb Your Enthusiasm'' may alienate those who like their comedy with less bite, but for them, the WB has resurrected ``Family Affair,'' and they're welcome to it.
Thus Billingsley now has two choices: Either he can raise prices and alienate his loyal clientele (which consists largely of retirees on fixed incomes), or he can close up shop altogether.
The insult to Parks only served to alienate Hahn from one of his most loyal constituencies, L.
Finally, commodity fetishism alienates us from nature, as we destroy it both in producing our products and in speedily throwing them away.
Sports Minister Gregory Campbell said the Team GB title applied to the UK's competitors excludes and alienates people from here.
At its most didactic, feminist art alienates the male portion of its audience; but when it entices, it's at women's expense.
Every time an incident occurs, it only alienates the Muslim community more.
It's their objectionable behaviour that alienates them from us.