alien

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Related to alienage: ghetto, 14th Amendment

alien

an organism, usually a plant, that is not native to the environment in which it occurs, and that is thought to have been introduced by man.
References in periodicals archive ?
On October 13 he made a declaration of alienage, which was returned to him by the Home Office as registered on January 16, 1917.
No one argues that the Marbois or van Berckel incidents prompted Congress to enact alienage jurisdiction.
79) The Supreme Court has held that the Equal Protection Clause applies to noncitizens, (80) and that as a general rule strict scrutiny applies to facial discrimination on the basis of alienage.
122) Johnson is deeply concerned with discrimination against immigrants and prospective immigrants through substantive and procedural law, law enforcement power and activity, adjudication of admission and deportation, and the creation of a new "Jim Crow" and a patchwork of state- and local-level laws on immigration and alienage.
based on alienage, (149) while the Court in Mathews v.
But if a friendly or neutral alien, such as a Dutch or British merchant in 1789, were to suffer such injury, he could sue under the ATS, even if the amount in controversy was below the $500 threshold required under the 1789 Act for general alienage diversity jurisdiction.
strict or intermediate--in reviewing race, national origin, alienage,
See Linda Bosniak, Universal Citizenship and the Problem of Alienage, 94 NW.
38) This strict scrutiny standard requires a state to show that a classification based on alienage satisfies a "compelling interest.
It is the Court that has taken from the States the right to make policy on abortion, capital punishment, criminal procedure, pornography, prayer in the schools, vagrancy control, street demonstrations, term limits, sexual morality, distinctions on the basis of sex, illegitimacy, alienage, and so on almost without end.
amp; CRIMINOLOGY 1, 17 (1999) (suggesting that the suspect's "culture, alienage, and language difficulties" be taken into account); Maclin, supra note 10, at 250 (endorsing consideration of suspect's race); Lourdes M.