alfalfa

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alfalfa

an herb that is grown throughout the world.
uses This herb is used for poor appetite, hay fever and asthma, and high cholesterol. It may also be used as a nutrient source.
contraindications Alfalfa is not recommended during pregnancy and lactation, in children, in persons using blood thinners, or in those with known hypersensitivity to it.

alfalfa

A bushy perennial that is a rich source of vitamins C, D, E and K, which is used primarily as animal fodder, though health-food advocates have made many extravagant claims for its use, including cancer treatmnet; alfalfa is administered internally for alcoholism, caries and diabetes, as well as bladder inflammation, gastrointestinal complaints (bloating, constipation, indigestion) and halitosis.

al·fal·fa

(al-fal'fă)
(Medicago sativa) A form of ground cover used as animal feed and as a nutritional supplement in humans. Sometimes eaten in salads. Many drug interactions are reported.
Synonym(s): lucerne, purple medick.
[Sp., fr. Ar. al-fasfasah]

alfalfa,

n Latin name:
Medicago sativa L.; parts used: buds, seeds (budding), entire plant; uses: diuretic, stomach disorders, arthritis, increase blood clotting, treat boils and bites; precautions: pregnancy, patients with lupus erythematosus; can cause hypotension, photosensitivity, and bleeding. Also called
buffalo herb, lucerne, purple medic, or
purple medick.

alfalfa

References in periodicals archive ?
Today, the Smiths attribute increased livestock numbers and weight gains without bloat to the fine-stemmed and fine-leaved falcata alfalfa, which they say the cattle prefer.
Ten years ago, scientists at the Cheyenne lab concluded that interseeding available varieties of alfalfa would be a good way to increase forage production and quality.
Then 3 years ago, Schuman visited the Smith ranch and saw the proliferating, interseeded areas of falcata alfalfa.
grown alfalfa varieties have a long, main root--called a taproot--that grows deep into the soil.
Vance says, "We are developing new alfalfa varieties for this changing world in which fertilizers and gasoline may one day be priced out of range or unavailable.
Says Lamb, "We think using alfalfa to produce ethanol on the side is part of the answer to making alfalfa a more profitable plant.
Ethanol production is just one of many ways to make alfalfa a more profitable crop.
For example, bioenergy alfalfa would ensure its profitability by producing a better forage or an industrial product in its leaves.
Unlike corn or soybeans, alfalfa plants are autotetraploid; that is, each trait is determined by genes residing in four chromosomes instead of two.
Over the past 30 years, average alfalfa yield has increased by roughly 1 percent, whereas corn, soybeans, and wheat have enjoyed far greater gains.
For example, along the "arms" of certain alfalfa chromosomes scientists identified thick bands of DNA and protein material called heterochromatin.
Following the conference, participants are encouraged to attend the Mid-America Alfalfa Expo at the nearby Buffalo County Fairgrounds.