aldehyde

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aldehyde

 [al´dĕ-hīd]
an organic compound containing the aldehyde functional group (-CHO); that is, one with a carbonyl group (C=O) located at one end of the carbon chain.

al·de·hyde

(al'dĕ-hīd),
A compound containing the radical -CH=O, reducible to an alcohol (CH2OH) and oxidizable to a carboxylic acid (COOH), for example, acetaldehyde.

aldehyde

/al·de·hyde/ (al´dĕ-hīd)
1. any of a class of organic compounds containing the group —CHO, i.e., one with a carbonyl group (CdbondO) located at one end of the carbon chain.
2. a suffix used to denote a compound occurring in aldehyde conformation.

aldehyde

[al′dəhīd′]
Etymology: Ar, alkohl + L, dehydrogenatum, dehydrogenated
any of a large category of organic compounds derived from the oxidation of a corresponding primary alcohol, as in the conversion of ethyl alcohol to acetaldehyde, also known as ethanal. Each aldehyde is characterized by a carbonyl group (─CO─) attached directly to a hydrogen (─CHO) in its formula and can be converted into a corresponding acid by oxidation, as in the conversion of acetaldehyde to acetic acid.

aldehyde

An organic compound with a formyl group (R-CHO), which is double-bonded to an O2 (i.e., a carbonyl group, C=O), single-bonded to a hydrogen and single-bonded to another group (e.g., methane, benzene, hydrogen, etc.). The aldehydes in some essential oils contribute to their pleasant odoor, including vanillin, cilantro and cinnamaldehyde.

Example
Acetaldehyde (CH3CHO), butyraldehyde (CH3(CH2)2CHO).

al·de·hyde

(al'dĕ-hīd)
A compound containing the radical -CH=O, reducible to an alcohol (-CH2OH), oxidizable to a carboxylic acid (-COOH); e.g., acetaldehyde.

aldehyde

A product of dehydrogenated (metabolized) alcohol, hence the name. Aldehydes cause most of the toxic effects of bibulous overindulgence (hangover).

aldehyde,

n hydrocarbon characterized by strong scent; antiviral, antiinflammatory, and soothing properties. Can irritate skin if administered improperly.
Enlarge picture
Aldehyde.

al·de·hyde

(al'dĕ-hīd)
A compound containing the radical -CH=O, reducible to an alcohol (-CH2OH), oxidizable to a carboxylic acid (-COOH); e.g., acetaldehyde.

aldehyde (al´dəhīd´),

n a large category of organic compounds derived from a corresponding alcohol by the removal of two hydrogen atoms, as in the conversion of ethyl alcohol to acetaldehyde.

aldehyde

an organic compound containing the aldehyde functional group (−CHO); that is, one with a carbonyl group (C=O) located at one end of the carbon chain. Aldehydes are formed in meat during the rancidification of fat and in the degradation of alcohols in biological materials. They have an acrid unpleasant taste and are toxic if taken in sufficient quantities. Some aldehydes (formaldehyde and glutaraldehyde) are used as disinfectants and fixatives.
References in periodicals archive ?
FTIR spectra of the membrane confirmed the presence of free hydroxyl groups, which is responsible for water holding capacity of the polysaccharide membrane and the absence of free aldehydic groups of GA, which minimizes the chance of cytotoxicity.
They probably form the more stable ketonic and aldehydic groups, by the migration of the low-molecular mass oxidized material, e.
But on the other hand, Costa said that while having a fresh aldehydic floral in a laundry detergent may connote fresh and clean, that same fragrance in a kitchen spray may "seem far too perfume-y and not exactly appropriate .
Aldehydic components of cinnamon bark extract suppresses RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis through NFATd downregulation.
For instance, a mere change of fragrance from citrus to a vanilla-type aldehydic note can cause color and odor instability issues when amine-type ingredients, such as amino acids, peptides or hydrolyzed proteins, are also present in that "base" formulation.
7, of a signal around 200 ppm assigned to aldehydic carbon seems to belie this assumption.
Conarom P contains phenethyl alcohol, a nature-identical ingredient, while the aldehydic and glycol component of Conarom H-3 is found in a variety of plants.