aldehyde


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Related to aldehyde: Aldehyde dehydrogenase

aldehyde

 [al´dĕ-hīd]
an organic compound containing the aldehyde functional group (-CHO); that is, one with a carbonyl group (C=O) located at one end of the carbon chain.

al·de·hyde

(al'dĕ-hīd),
A compound containing the radical -CH=O, reducible to an alcohol (CH2OH) and oxidizable to a carboxylic acid (COOH), for example, acetaldehyde.

aldehyde

/al·de·hyde/ (al´dĕ-hīd)
1. any of a class of organic compounds containing the group —CHO, i.e., one with a carbonyl group (CdbondO) located at one end of the carbon chain.
2. a suffix used to denote a compound occurring in aldehyde conformation.

aldehyde

[al′dəhīd′]
Etymology: Ar, alkohl + L, dehydrogenatum, dehydrogenated
any of a large category of organic compounds derived from the oxidation of a corresponding primary alcohol, as in the conversion of ethyl alcohol to acetaldehyde, also known as ethanal. Each aldehyde is characterized by a carbonyl group (─CO─) attached directly to a hydrogen (─CHO) in its formula and can be converted into a corresponding acid by oxidation, as in the conversion of acetaldehyde to acetic acid.

aldehyde

An organic compound with a formyl group (R-CHO), which is double-bonded to an O2 (i.e., a carbonyl group, C=O), single-bonded to a hydrogen and single-bonded to another group (e.g., methane, benzene, hydrogen, etc.). The aldehydes in some essential oils contribute to their pleasant odoor, including vanillin, cilantro and cinnamaldehyde.

Example
Acetaldehyde (CH3CHO), butyraldehyde (CH3(CH2)2CHO).

al·de·hyde

(al'dĕ-hīd)
A compound containing the radical -CH=O, reducible to an alcohol (-CH2OH), oxidizable to a carboxylic acid (-COOH); e.g., acetaldehyde.

aldehyde

A product of dehydrogenated (metabolized) alcohol, hence the name. Aldehydes cause most of the toxic effects of bibulous overindulgence (hangover).

aldehyde,

n hydrocarbon characterized by strong scent; antiviral, antiinflammatory, and soothing properties. Can irritate skin if administered improperly.
Enlarge picture
Aldehyde.

al·de·hyde

(al'dĕ-hīd)
A compound containing the radical -CH=O, reducible to an alcohol (-CH2OH), oxidizable to a carboxylic acid (-COOH); e.g., acetaldehyde.

aldehyde (al´dəhīd´),

n a large category of organic compounds derived from a corresponding alcohol by the removal of two hydrogen atoms, as in the conversion of ethyl alcohol to acetaldehyde.

aldehyde

an organic compound containing the aldehyde functional group (−CHO); that is, one with a carbonyl group (C=O) located at one end of the carbon chain. Aldehydes are formed in meat during the rancidification of fat and in the degradation of alcohols in biological materials. They have an acrid unpleasant taste and are toxic if taken in sufficient quantities. Some aldehydes (formaldehyde and glutaraldehyde) are used as disinfectants and fixatives.
References in periodicals archive ?
Formation of alkoxyhydroperoxy aldehydes and cyclic peroxyhemiacetals from reactions of cyclic alkenes with [O.
Identification of fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase in the breakdown of phytol to phytanic acid.
One reason given that simultaneous reaction of aldehyde and methanol with poly(vinyl acetate) to produce PVB is not practiced commercially is that the simultaneous process does not allow for generation of PVB with sufficiently low acetate content.
For example: For low aldehyde levels, the peanuts should be roasted at 121 [degrees] C.
Expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 in the normal esophageal epithelium and alcohol consnmption in patients with esophageal cancer.
In this study, the author compared the contents of odorous aldehydes and fatty acids in dithionite-bleached TMP made from spruce, pine, and a mixture of the two.
In addition, some studies have shown that odor-causing compounds like aldehydes and ketones, can be released from thermal oxidation of polyethylene, and these most unpleasant odors can be caused by carbonyl compounds in a certain molecular weight range (4-6).
For predicting or modeling aldehyde emissions more information is fundamental.
In the course of development, the group has discovered that two flavor elements, geraniol found in rose and vanillic aldehyde derived from vanilla, have higher emission efficiencies.
The observations showed that spruce-and pinewood based pellets differentiated mainly in their aldehyde emissions whereby pinewood based pellets emitted substantially more aldehydes.
Researchers at the University of Georgia determined the activity of cinnamic aldehyde when it is exposed to high temperatures.