aldehyde


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Related to aldehyde: Aldehyde dehydrogenase

aldehyde

 [al´dĕ-hīd]
an organic compound containing the aldehyde functional group (-CHO); that is, one with a carbonyl group (C=O) located at one end of the carbon chain.

al·de·hyde

(al'dĕ-hīd),
A compound containing the radical -CH=O, reducible to an alcohol (CH2OH) and oxidizable to a carboxylic acid (COOH), for example, acetaldehyde.

aldehyde

/al·de·hyde/ (al´dĕ-hīd)
1. any of a class of organic compounds containing the group —CHO, i.e., one with a carbonyl group (CdbondO) located at one end of the carbon chain.
2. a suffix used to denote a compound occurring in aldehyde conformation.

aldehyde

[al′dəhīd′]
Etymology: Ar, alkohl + L, dehydrogenatum, dehydrogenated
any of a large category of organic compounds derived from the oxidation of a corresponding primary alcohol, as in the conversion of ethyl alcohol to acetaldehyde, also known as ethanal. Each aldehyde is characterized by a carbonyl group (─CO─) attached directly to a hydrogen (─CHO) in its formula and can be converted into a corresponding acid by oxidation, as in the conversion of acetaldehyde to acetic acid.

aldehyde

An organic compound with a formyl group (R-CHO), which is double-bonded to an O2 (i.e., a carbonyl group, C=O), single-bonded to a hydrogen and single-bonded to another group (e.g., methane, benzene, hydrogen, etc.). The aldehydes in some essential oils contribute to their pleasant odoor, including vanillin, cilantro and cinnamaldehyde.

Example
Acetaldehyde (CH3CHO), butyraldehyde (CH3(CH2)2CHO).

al·de·hyde

(al'dĕ-hīd)
A compound containing the radical -CH=O, reducible to an alcohol (-CH2OH), oxidizable to a carboxylic acid (-COOH); e.g., acetaldehyde.

aldehyde

A product of dehydrogenated (metabolized) alcohol, hence the name. Aldehydes cause most of the toxic effects of bibulous overindulgence (hangover).

aldehyde,

n hydrocarbon characterized by strong scent; antiviral, antiinflammatory, and soothing properties. Can irritate skin if administered improperly.
Enlarge picture
Aldehyde.

al·de·hyde

(al'dĕ-hīd)
A compound containing the radical -CH=O, reducible to an alcohol (-CH2OH), oxidizable to a carboxylic acid (-COOH); e.g., acetaldehyde.

aldehyde (al´dəhīd´),

n a large category of organic compounds derived from a corresponding alcohol by the removal of two hydrogen atoms, as in the conversion of ethyl alcohol to acetaldehyde.

aldehyde

an organic compound containing the aldehyde functional group (−CHO); that is, one with a carbonyl group (C=O) located at one end of the carbon chain. Aldehydes are formed in meat during the rancidification of fat and in the degradation of alcohols in biological materials. They have an acrid unpleasant taste and are toxic if taken in sufficient quantities. Some aldehydes (formaldehyde and glutaraldehyde) are used as disinfectants and fixatives.
References in periodicals archive ?
Falck, (z)-a-Haloacrylates: An exceptionally Stereoselective Preparation via cr (ii)-Mediated Olefination of Aldehydes with Trihaloacetates, J.
Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 enhances cardiomyocytes viability exposes to high glucose by autophagy.
Figure 2 illustrates the alteration of VOC composition among terpenes (green) and aldehydes (red) throughout the experiment.
Koshiba (1998) Higher activity of an aldehyde oxidase in the auxin- overproducing superroot1 mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana.
Esters and aldehydes could be considered a fault or aromas that are intrinsically valuable to a wine style, depending upon what we are trying to achieve.
2008), the recombinant enzyme showed oxidative activity toward only TMABaldehyde and no aldehyde produced by the reversible reaction.
1] corresponding to aldehyde groups are very weak when the molar ratio of U/l/F is 1.
In the play, one 3-carbon aldehyde floats away to signify its separation from the rest that will go through the next few steps: the regeneration process.
KEY WORDS: Ethanol metabolism; ethanol-to-acetaldehyde metabolism; acetaldehyde; acetate; aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH); central nervous system; brain; catalase; cytochrome P450; alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH); ethanol oxidation; behavior; ethanol preference
3] influences aldehyde emissions, with concentrations of some emitted oxidation products exceeding their odor thresholds (Morrison and Nazaroff 2002).
Five chemicals in raisins--oleanolic acid, oleanolic aldehyde, betulin, betulinic acid, and 5-(hydroxymethyl)-2-furfural--are thought to be responsible for the protection, at least in the laboratory.
Because aldehyde groups are efficiently introduced into the TEMPO-oxidized pulps, the wet tensile strength improvement of the handsheets must be brought about by inter-fiber covalent bond formation.