alcoholic pancreatitis


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alcoholic pancreatitis

Pancreatitis due to excessive (typically chronic) alcohol consumption. It is the second most common cause of pancreatitis, after ductal obstruction by gallstones.
See also: pancreatitis
References in periodicals archive ?
This article reviews past theories and current knowledge about the pathophysiology of chronic alcoholic pancreatitis, with particular emphasis on alcohol metabolism by acinar and stellate cells and on the toxic effects of alcohol and its metabolites on these cells.
Given the failure of the sphincteric and ductular obstruction theories to fully explain the pathogenesis of alcoholic pancreatitis, the attention of researchers has shifted over the past 10 years toward the acinar cells, the most abundant cells in the pancreas.
Of particular interest to the pathogenesis of chronic alcoholic pancreatitis is the finding that PSCs are activated by exposure to physiologically relevant concentrations of ethanol (10 and 50 mM [i.
Such studies of potential risk factors for alcoholic pancreatitis ideally should compare alcoholics without pancreatic disease with alcoholics displaying pancreatic injury, but this has not always been the case.
Other studies have shown that excessive alcohol consumption is more frequent among patients with unsatisfactory surgical results and have considered patients with alcoholic pancreatitis poor candidates for surgery.
Among these 3 patterns, the fibrosis of chronic alcoholic pancreatitis was found mainly in the perilobular or interlobular areas with a nodular lobular appearance.
The most commonly cited theory for the cause of chronic alcoholic pancreatitis suggests the deposition of protein plugs that later calcify, leading to duct obstruction with subsequent fibrotic replacement of the acinar tissue upstream from the occlusion.
In this study, we investigated the mechanism of interlobular fibrosis of the pancreas, which is categorized as chronic alcoholic pancreatitis, based on histologic changes in the pancreatic tissue in patients with ampullary carcinomas with various degrees of stricture of the main pancreatic duct.
In addition, 20 patients with clinically diagnosed chronic alcoholic pancreatitis (mean age, 52 years) at Juntendo University Hospital were included in this study.
Individuals with chronic alcoholic pancreatitis, in particular, present late, so that the half-life of the enzymes in serum after an acute attack has to be taken into account [23-25].