alcoholic fermentation


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Related to alcoholic fermentation: Lactic acid fermentation

al·co·hol·ic fer·men·ta·tion

the anaerobic formation of ethanol and CO2 from d-glucose. Compare: Gay-Lussac equation.

alcoholic fermentation

the conversion of carbohydrates to ethyl alcohol.

alcoholic fermentation

Production of ethyl alcohol from carbohydrates, usually through the action of yeasts.
See also: fermentation
Alcoholic fermentationclick for a larger image
Fig. 22 Alcoholic fermentation . The production of ethanol from glucose.

alcoholic fermentation

a type of CELLULAR RESPIRATION found in plants and some unicells which does not require oxygen, and that results in the production of ethanol (an alcohol) from GLUCOSE and the release of small amounts of energy. The main details are described under ANAEROBIC RESPIRATION but, briefly, fermentation involves GLYCOLYSIS to produce PYRUVIC ACID and then (in the absence of oxygen) the breakdown of pyruvic acid to ethanol via ethanal with the release of CO2 .

See also Fig. 34 .

References in periodicals archive ?
This product is a specialty yeast for standard, premium, and ultra-premium wine producers that helps them mimic successful wild alcoholic fermentation.
The wines complete malolactic and alcoholic fermentation within 10 days and are then microbiologically stable.
The present work aims to compare the dynamic of uncontrolled yeasts involved in spontaneous fermentation on the performance of controlled yeast such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae used in alcoholic fermentation at several temperatures.
Alcoholic fermentation process Before beginning the fermentation process, fresh cocoa juice was analysed to determine certain chemical characteristics such as pH, moisture content, titratable acidity, sugar content and inorganic component.
This trouble induced by higher temperatures could lead to low speed of citric acid consumption and ethanol production; but these phenomena were favourable to secondary products (acetic acid) production during spontaneous fermentation and lactic acid during controlled alcoholic fermentation particularly at 35 [degrees]C [12].
In spontaneous alcoholic fermentation held at 41[degrees]C, savage yeasts seem not to be all inhibited by higher temperatures as the residual sugar content was low (27 g/L).
The increase in the ethanol content and the corresponding decrease in the total soluble solids in Kwete was attributed to the alcoholic fermentation carried out by yeast.