alcohol-related birth defect


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alcohol-related birth defect

Any birth defect related to alcohol consumption—e.g., prenatal or postnatal growth retardation, facial dysmorphia (thin upper lip, poorly-developed philtrum, short nose, and small eye openings), CNS defects with mental retardation. When multiple ARBDs are present, the term “fetal alcohol syndrome” is used.

alcohol-related birth defect

A congenital abnormality that reflects the teratogenic effects of maternal alcohol use on developing fetal structures. The most common abnormalities involve the heart, eyes, kidneys, and skeleton.
See: fetal alcohol effects; fetal alcohol syndrome
See also: defect
References in periodicals archive ?
It is associated with a high alcohol elimination rate, intense response to alcohol, and decreased risk of alcohol-related birth defects (Thomasson et al.
3) Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder includes fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS), fetal alcohol effects (FAE), alcohol-related birth defects (ARBD), and alcohol-related neurodevelopmental disorder (ARND) (for a review, see Sampson et al.
Since the late 1970s, many studies have reported on the prevalence of fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS), alcohol-related birth defects (ARBD), and alcohol-related neurodevelopmental disorders (ARND).
Establishing the prevalence (1) and other epidemiological characteristics of fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS), alcohol-related birth defects (ARBD), and alcohol-related neurodevelopmental disorder (ARND) (2) has been a difficult challenge ever since Jones and colleagues (Jones and Smith 1973; Jones et al.
The term "prevalence" is used, in this article to describe the frequency of occurrence or presence of fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS), alcohol-related birth defects (ARBD), and alcohol-related neurodevelopmental disorder, (ARND) among the study population and any subgroups within the population at all time periods during the life span.
Such a marker could also help identify women at risk for alcohol use during subsequent pregnancies, help to detect underreporting of alcohol use during pregnancy, and facilitate research on dose-response relationships between alcohol exposure and alcohol-related birth defects (Stratton et al.
Detecting alcohol use among pregnant women is an important step toward preventing alcohol-related birth defects.
In addition, some prenatally exposed children without FAS facial features exhibit other alcohol-related physical abnormalities of the skeleton and certain organ systems; these anomalies are referred to as alcohol-related birth defects (ARBD).

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