alcohol myopia

alcohol myopia

A term for a postulated effect of alcohol on users which causes them to focus more on certain environmental cues and less on others.

Some workers believe this myopia can make an inebriated person less likely to engage in high risk sexual activities than his or her sober counterparts under certain circumstances.
References in periodicals archive ?
This finding may relate to alcohol myopia theory (Steele & Joseph, 1990).
This finding was interpreted using an alcohol myopia framework.
Numerous psychological studies support the theory of alcohol myopia, and have shown that individuals change their behavior, sometimes by engaging in risky activities when intoxicated with alcohol.
However, if alcohol consumption increases the importance of more immediate cues and reduces that of less immediate ones, as alcohol myopia assumes, then the consumption of alcohol can also increase prudent behavior if the associated costs of a lottery are in the present and the rewards are in the future.
The aim of the present study was to perform a literature review, focusing on the Alcohol Myopia Theory and on its meaning in order to clarify the interaction between alcohol intoxication, emotion and cognition.
In this vein, the Alcohol Myopia Theory assumes that cognitive and attentional systems play a mediator role in the behavioral effects associated to alcohol consumption.
Specifically, alcohol myopia might lead the initiator to interpret the sexual attractiveness or sexual behavior of the target as an invitation for sexual advances, and to be focused on this attractiveness rather than the possibility that his or her overtures might not be welcome.
Religious convictions (Poulson, Eppler, Satterwhite, Wuensch, & Bass, 1998), alcohol myopia (Cooper, 2002; MacDonald, MacDonald, Zanna, & Fong, 2000.
Many behavioral studies, specifically studies of alcohol myopia, have explored the effect of alcohol on risk taking (Fromme et al.
Alcohol myopia involves both perceiving fewer cues and being less aware of internal values and cues [see also explanation #14).
The alcohol myopia that contributes to these conflicting perceptions may play a strong role in the progression of sexual assault (Abbey, 2002).