alchemical hypnotherapy

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alchemical hypnotherapy

A type of hynotherapy developed by a D Quigley, in California, that combines Jungian and transpersonal psychology, neurolinguistic programming, past-life/lives therapy, psychosynthesis and shamanism. Quigley believed that the technique helps the client work with his or her Inner Guides to change his or her life.

There is no peer-reviewed data to support the efficacy of this technique
References in periodicals archive ?
Considered as not only a poetic composition, but also an emotional, mystical and alchemical work, Ode Maritima is investigated by del Pozo Ortea as an inner journey within the fragmented psyche of the Portuguese poet, a journey that, through the voice of his more primordial of heteronyms, Alvaro de Campos, represents an exploration between human instincts.
Newton was a committed alchemist for 30 years," Newman said, "but he kept his activities in this realm largely hidden from his contemporaries and colleagues, so his alchemical work has been imperfectly known.
He presents selected passages on such matters as the psychic nature of the alchemical work, the personification of the opposites, and the symbolic life, and illuminates their significance by drawing on his own experiences.
If you think all languages have been deciphered, this manuscript offers up a challenge--and provides unique symbols leading to the possibility that it's a lost alchemical work.
15) that the first Ashkenazic alchemical work dates from the eighteenth century.
The volume also reflects the application of gender theory and other recent theoretical perspectives to the study of alchemy together with the more traditional textual analysis of alchemical works that has long been part of serious scholarship.
Among her topics are the cultural and medical construction of gender, hermetic hermaphrodites, gender and power in the alchemical works of Clovis Hesteau de Nuysement, and Henri III of France as the royal hermaphrodite.
Such abstraction and experiment could be found on a smaller scale throughout the show, particularly in paintings of printing errors and in alchemical works, made with varnish and metals, that turn transparent and brittle, and oxidize beautifully, rendering change visible.
Prince Stanislas Klossowski de Rola (whose father is the painter Balthus) tells us during the 17th century "an unprecedented quantity of alchemical works were printed, a significant number of which contained copperplate engravings.