alarm symptom


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alarm symptom

MedspeakUK A generic term for any symptom that would make any experienced GP in the UK “stand up and take notice.”
Example Painless haematuria in an elderly male, which would trigger a 2-week wait referral. 
MedspeakUS Any of a number of symptoms (e.g., haematuria, dysphagia, haemoptysis, or rectal bleeding) which would cause a reasonable physician to investigate further until a diagnosis (usually of cancer) or a satisfactory explanation has been obtained, including that of serious non-malignant conditions.

alarm symptom

A symptom that raises the concern that a patient may have a severe illness and requires careful evaluation. For example, in patients with digestive illnesses, findings such as anemia, anorexia, bleeding, dehydration, fever, or weight loss are considered alarm symptoms.
See also: symptom
References in periodicals archive ?
Experts in this area have concluded that all patients under the age of 55 with no alarm symptoms who present with uninvestigated dyspepsia should be tested for H pylori, using breath testing or stool antigen testing.
He believes that all patients with alarm symptoms should be scoped urgently, but those without should be given at least one trial of dietary change or medication before moving to endoscopy.
This study enrolled 699 adults with general symptoms of epigastric pain, heartburn, or both, lasting for at least 4 weeks but without alarm symptoms.
The guidelines recommend gastroenterology consultation or upper endoscopy to rule out neoplastic or pre-neoplastic lesions if alarm symptoms (TABLE) suggesting complicated GERD are present.
A family physician, for example, may be less likely to see patients with alarm symptoms than a specialist.
FAST TRACK Routine diagnostic testing is not recommended for patients without alarm symptoms or signs of organic disorder
A common primary care strategy for patients with dyspepsia and no alarm symptoms is to prescribe a proton-pump inhibitor.
For patients aged <50 years without alarm symptoms, diagnostic testing is unnecessary.
The American College of Gastroenterology recommends EGD for GERD patients who do not respond to therapy, experience alarm symptoms, who have chronic symptoms and are at risk for Barrett's esophagus, and need continuous chronic therapy.
Evidence supports a "test and treat" approach for the initial management of patients younger than 45 years who do not have alarm symptoms for malignancy or complicated disease and immediate endoscopy for patients older than 45 years or who have alarm symptoms.
The protocol excluded patients with dysmotility and untypeable dyspepsia, patients with dysmotility and other types of dyspepsia, and those with a history of peptic ulcer disease, reflux esophagitis, alarm symptoms (weight loss, dysphagia, bloody or black stools, anemia, jaundice), or current nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use.