alanine aminotransferase


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Related to alanine aminotransferase: aspartate aminotransferase

alanine aminotransferase

 [al´ah-nēn ah-me″no-trans´fer-ās]
ALT; alanine transaminase.

al·a·nine a·mi·no·trans·fer·ase (ALT),

(al'ă-nēn a-mē'nō-tranz'fer-ās),
An enzyme transferring amino groups from l-alanine to 2-ketoglutarate, or the reverse (from l-glutamate to pyruvate); one d-alanine transaminase effects the same reaction, but using d-alanine and d-glutamate. Serum concentration is increased in viral hepatitis and myocardial infarction.

alanine aminotransferase

/al·a·nine ami·no·trans·fer·ase/ (ah-me″no-trans´fer-ās) alanine transaminase.

alanine aminotransferase (ALT)

an enzyme normally present in the serum and tissues of the body, especially the tissues of the liver. This enzyme catalyzes the transfer of an amino group from alanine to alpha-ketoglutarate, forming pyruvate and glutamate. The reaction is reversible. The enzyme is released into the serum as a result of tissue injury and increases in persons with acute liver damage. Normal findings are 5 to 35 IU/L. Also called alanine transferase, glutamic pyruvic transferase, serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (SGPT). Compare aspartate aminotransferase.

alanine aminotransferase

Glutamine pyruvic transaminase, GPT Clinical chemistry An enzyme found primarily in the liver, with lesser amounts in the kidneys, heart and skeletal muscles; low levels of ALT are normal in the circulation; after liver damage, ALT is released into the bloodstream before more obvious clinical findings of liver damage–eg jaundice, occur; ↑ ALT is an early indicator of acute liver damage; ALT is measured as part of a panel of blood chemistry tests Ref ranges ♂ 10-32 U/L; ♀ 9-24 U/L; children 2 times > adults; AA is ↑ in viral hepatitis, drug-induced hepatitis, infectious mononucleosis, chronic hepatitis, intrahepatic cholestasis, cholecystitis, active cirrhosis, acute MI. See Aspartate amino transferase, Gamma-glutamyl transferase.

al·a·nine a·mi·no·trans·fer·ase

(ALT) (al'ă-nēn ă-mē'nō-trans'fĕr-ās)
An enzyme transferring amino groups from l-alanine to 2-ketoglutarate, or the reverse (from l-glutamate to pyruvate); serum concentration is increased in viral hepatitis and myocardial infarction.
Synonym(s): glutamic-pyruvic transaminase, serum glutamic-pyruvic transaminase.

al·a·nine a·mi·no·trans·fer·ase

(ALT) (al'ă-nēn ă-mē'nō-trans'fĕr-ās)
An enzyme transferring amino groups from l-alanine to 2-ketoglutarate, or the reverse (from l-glutamate to pyruvate); serum concentration is increased in viral hepatitis and myocardial infarction.
Synonym(s): glutamic-pyruvic transaminase, serum glutamic-pyruvic transaminase,
alanine transaminase.

alanine aminotransferase

an enzyme that catalyzes the reversible transfer of an amino group in the reaction:
$$\hbox{alanine + 2-oxoglutarate \leftrightharpoonsarrow\,\! pyruvate + glutamate}$$
requiring the coenzyme pyridoxal phosphate. Abbreviated ALT. It is present in high concentrations in hepatocytes of dogs, cats and humans. The serum concentration is elevated, especially when there is acute damage to liver cells, as in viral or toxic hepatitis, and obstructive jaundice. Significant elevation of the serum levels of ALT is a specific indicator of liver damage only in small animals and primates. Called also glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (GPT).
References in periodicals archive ?
Alanine aminotransferase as a marker of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in relation to type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease.
Other laboratory test data were as follows: alanine aminotransferase, 26 U/L; aspartate aminotransferase, 34 U/L; [Gamma]-glutamyltransferase, 18 U/L; and alkaline phosphatase, 83 U/L.
Alanine aminotransferase (glutamate pyruvate transaminase).
Attribute a mild chronic elevation in alanine aminotransferase to fatty liver disease only after considering eight other diagnoses, Dr.
Laboratory values were altered for aminotransferases (aspartate aminotransferase, 273 U/L; alanine aminotransferase, 77 U/L), hemoglobin (7.
Hepsera also provided sustained improvement in liver function through 96 weeks, as measured by blood levels of the liver enzyme alanine aminotransferase (ALT).
9 g/dL, exaggerated plasma fibrin formation and degradation, and hepatic cytolysis with both aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase levels of 80 U/L.
Three times as many Hepsera patients showed improvements in liver function, as measured by a reduction to normal levels of the liver enzyme alanine aminotransferase (ALT), as compared to placebo (48 percent vs.
Presentations varied greatly, ranging from incidental elevations of aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase levels to severe liver dysfunction.
Laboratory findings in specimens from these animals included severe leukopenia and thrombocytopenia and increased levels of the liver enzymes alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase (data not shown).
Among patients not previously treated with a nucleoside analogue, the rates of histologic improvement, serologic response, and normalization of alanine aminotransferase levels were significantly higher at 48 weeks with entecavir than with lamivudine.