akathisia


Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to akathisia: pseudoparkinsonism

akathisia

 [ak″ah-thĭ´zhah]
a condition of motor restlessness in which there is a feeling of muscular quivering, an urge to move about constantly, and an inability to sit still, a common side effect of neuroleptic drugs.

a·ka·thi·si·a

(ak-ă-thiz'ē-ă),
A syndrome characterized by an inability to remain seated, with motor restlessness and a feeling of muscular quivering; may appear as a side effect of antipsychotic and neuroleptic medication.
Synonym(s): acathisia
[G. a- priv. + kathisis, a sitting]

akathisia

/ak·a·this·ia/ (ak″ah-thĭ´zhah) a condition marked by motor restlessness, ranging from anxiety to inability to lie or sit quietly or to sleep, a common extrapyramidal side effect of neuroleptic drugs.

akathisia

[ak′əthē′zhə]
Etymology: Gk, a + kathizein, not to sit
a pathological condition characterized by restlessness and agitation, such as an inability to sit still. akathisiac, adj.

akathisia

(1) Restless leg syndrome/Willis-Ekbom disease (jimmy legs).
(2) Motor restlessness ranging from a sense of inner restlessness to inability to sit or lie still, fidgeting, rocking from foot to foot and pacing, accompanied by a sensation of muscular quivering and an urge to stay in constant motion.

Aetiology
Akathisia is a common extrapyramidal effect of neuroleptic and antipsychotic drug therapy. Symptoms can develop within a few weeks of starting or raising the dose of traditional neuroleptic medications or of reducing the dose of drugs used to treat extrapyramidal symptoms.

akathisia

Antsiness Neurology Motor restlessness ranging from a feeling of inner disquiet to inability to sit still or lie quietly, accompanied by a sensation of muscular quivering, and an urge to be in constant motion, a common extrapyramidal effect of neuroleptics/antipsychotics. See Extrapyramidal syndrome.

a·ka·thi·sia

(ak-ă-thiz'ē-ă)
A syndrome characterized by an inability to remain in a sitting posture, with motor restlessness and a feeling of muscular quivering; may appear as a side effect of antipsychotic and neuroleptic medication.
[G. a- priv. + kathisis, a sitting]

akathisia

The inability to sit quietly because of uncontrollable movements caused by drugs, especially the phenothiazine derivatives (see PHENOTHIAZINE DRUGS) used to treat mental disorders.

Akathisia

Agitated or restless movement, usually affecting the legs and accompanied by a sense of discomfort. It is a common side effect of neuroleptic medications.
Mentioned in: Schizophrenia
References in periodicals archive ?
The following symptoms, anxiety, agitation, panic attacks, insomnia, irritability, hostility, aggressiveness, impulsivity, akathisia (psychomotor restlessness), hypomania, and mania, have been reported in adult and pediatric patients being treated with antidepressants for major depressive disorder as well as for other indications, both psychiatric and nonpsychiatric.
These studies have explored the well-established link between antipsychotic drugs and akathisia (27).
Antipsychotics are known to cause dysphoria associated with akinesia and akathisia and these should be managed adequately by reducing the dosage or adding anticholinergics.
Because the FDA had never been asked to consider whether the warnings on metoclopramide regarding akathisia ought to be strengthened, there could be "no conflict between state and federal law, and preemption does not apply.
The other untreatable disorder is tardive akathisia involving painful feelings of inner anxiety and a compulsive drive to move the body.
The proposed new warnings also alert prescribers, patients, and their caregivers to the emergence of symptoms that are known to be associated with antidepressants in some patients: anxiety, agitation, panic attacks, insomnia, irritability, hostility, impulsivity, akathisia, hypomania, and mania.
A RESTLESS legs syndrome, known as akathisia, is characterised by an uncontrollable desire to move the legs.
Among the most serious are extrapyramidal side effects (EPS), which include dystonic reactions, akathisia, and parkinsonism.
A 1975 paper described a negative effect called akathisia, a drug-induced inability to sit still comfortably.
The most commonly reported adverse reactions (5% and twice placebo), which were predominantly mild to moderate in severity, were akathisia, extrapyramidal disorder, dyspepsia, restlessness, tremor, fatigue and vomiting.