airway anatomy

air·way a·nat·o·my

(ār'wā ă-nat'ŏ-mē)
The tracheobronchial structure, similar in shape to that of an inverted tree, containing three types of airways: cartilaginous airways (trachea, main bronchi, and approximately five generations of small bronchi); membranous bronchioles (approximately eight generations of noncartilaginous airways); and respiratory bronchioles (approximately five generations of gas-exchange or alveolar ducts).
References in periodicals archive ?
Ventilatory control and airway anatomy in obstructive sleep apnea.
Researchers sought to determine the effect of the product on the respiratory system using ferrets, which have an airway anatomy and cellular composition similar to humans.
Anaesthetic guidelines for determining airway anatomy recommend estimating 'thyromental distance' ie the space between the thyroid cartilage and floor of mouth (Magboul 2005).
Only soft tissue with no identifiable airway anatomy could be seen (Cormack and Lehane grade 4) (8).
While there is no concrete evidence of a mechanism which might explain these findings, lead researcher Dr Karl Franklin, from University Hospital Umea, suggested that they could all "enhance inflammatory processes" and "alter upper airway anatomy early in life".
2] laser vaporization targeting laryngeal edema--may be worth considering, depending on the specific patient's airway anatomy.
Many of them have altered airway anatomy because of disease or prior surgery.
In contrast to other surgical procedures to treat sleep apnea, Inspire therapy does not require removing or permanently altering an OSA patient's facial or airway anatomy.
Tory was built on our platform developed with Victoria that includes soft feeling skin, realistic covered joints and accurate airway anatomy, all of which suspend disbelief and allow for true-to-life training experiences.
Three factors that play a significant role in the development of OSA are: (i) a reduction in the dilating forces of the pharyngeal dilators, (ii) the negative inspiratory pressure generated by the diaphragm, and (iii) abnormal upper airway anatomy, the element most effectively addressed by surgery.
Furthermore, patients with unusual airway anatomy may present special difficulties even to an experienced surgeon during an airway crisis, resulting in a poor outcome.
While there is no concrete evidence of a mechanism which might explain these findings, lead researcher Dr Karl Franklin, from University Hospital Umea, suggested that they could all eIuenhance inflammatory processeseIN and eIualter upper airway anatomy early in lifeeIN.