airborne transmission


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Related to airborne transmission: droplet transmission, contact transmission

airborne transmission

The transmission of pathogens (bacteria, viruses, spores) by aerosol, from one vector/host to another. Once inside the vector’s respiratory tract, the “bug” develops, matures, reproduces, becomes contagious, and is transmitted to the next host.

airborne transmission

Epidemiology The transmission of pathogens by aerosol, which enter the body by the respiratory tract. See Aerosol.

airborne transmission

transmission of infection due to inhalation of clinical dust or deposition of aerosol fluids (e.g. infected skin squames, nail dust, fungal spores, blood, tissue fluid, lesion exudates and pus)

transmission

1. transfer, as of an infection from one patient to another.
2. of nervous impulses. See neuromuscular transmission.
3. heredity.

airborne transmission
spread of infection by droplet nuclei or dust through the air. Without the intervention of winds or drafts the distance over which airborne infection takes place is short, say 10 to 20 feet.
arthropod transmission
by insect, either mechanically via a contaminated proboscis or feet, or biologically when there is growth or replication of the organism in the arthropod. See also trans-stadial.
biological transmission
involving a biological process, e.g. passing a stage of development of the infecting agent in an intermediate host. Opposite to mechanical transmission.
colostral transmission
a form of vertical transmission via successive generations.
contact transmission
the disease agent is transferred directly by biting, sucking, chewing or indirectly by inhalation of droplets, drinking of contaminated water, traveling in contaminated vehicles.
cyclopropagative transmission
the agent undergoes both development and multiplication in the transmitting vehicle.
developmental transmission
the agent undergoes some development in the transmission vehicle.
fecal-oral transmission
the infectious agent is shed by the infected host in feces and acquired by the susceptible host through ingestion of contamined material.
horizontal transmission
lateral spread to others in the same group and at the same time; spread to contemporaries.
mechanical transmission
the transmitter is not infected in that tissues are not invaded and the agent does not multiply.
propagative transmission
the agent multiplies in the transmission vehicle.
vector transmission
see vector.
vertical transmission
from one generation to the next, perhaps transovarially or by intrauterine infection of the fetus. Some retroviruses are transmitted in the germ line, i.e. their genetic material is integrated into the DNA of either the ovum or sperm.
References in periodicals archive ?
Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus isolation from air samples collected using cyclone air sampler during simulated slaughter of infected chickens (A) and ducks (B) in study of airborne transmission of highly pathogenic influenza virus during processing of infected poultry.
When an infection source is present in the space (infected occupant who releases potentially infectious droplets via cough), spatial and temporal distribution of the occupants around the source will determine their exposure and levels of risk via airborne transmission route.
If airborne transmission was a pathway of the community outbreak at Amoy Gardens, meteorological factors could have contributed, and those factors are explored here.
Aerosol or airborne transmission is also a possibility, although believed to be much less likely.
Many microbiologists employ UV-C germicidal lamps within engineering control measures to reduce the risk of infection caused by airborne transmission of bacterial pathogens within closed environments.
The ARS research about 10 years ago changed to testing commercially available negative air ion generators to determine whether their dust reduction capability could reduce airborne transmission of poultry diseases.
Early trials in 1994 suggested the process would reduce dust and had the potential to reduce airborne transmission of Newcastle disease virus and other disease organisms such as Salmonella.
Contact is the most common way in which infection is spread - with hand- washing the single most important measure to prevent it - but less is known about airborne transmission.
Exposure to micro-organisms is related to a variety of factors, including airborne transmission.
Although airborne transmission does occur, it is those cute little digits that once again are the usual culprit.
Everyone notices how "live" an empty room is (lack of acoustic absorbing materials) or the effect of closing a door to a noisy room (blocking the airborne transmission of sound).
This contact is commonly through an airborne transmission.

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