air rage


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air rage

n.
Abusive or violent behavior exhibited by airline passengers, often as a manifestation of impatience or stress.
Anger and frustration—more commonly seen in economy class than in upper class—which occurs before, during or after a commercial airline flight, generally while the passenger(s) is still aboard, related to prolonged sitting in an uncomfortable position, aggravating seat mates, low quality food, and other factors which set the stage for a rage reaction that may lead to physical or verbal assault on crew members or other passengers
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Chubb is adding the cover to its Masterpiece policy after publishing what it claims is Britain's first comprehensive report on air rage, carried out by criminal psychologists Professor David Canter and Dr Donna Youngs.
But the company has been forced to change its plans after Jones pleaded guilty to charges of air rage arising on a flight from London to Tokyo.
The lack of a specific description of air rage and what it encompasses has made recognizing it difficult.
The quality of services that airline customers expect and the propensity toward air rage needs to be understood.
Houlihan admitted air rage on board an Aer Lingus flight to Shannon on June 8 when gardai said he "became violent on board".
An Emirates Airline spokeswoman said: "We have special training sessions to deal with air rage incidents such as this and nobody was hurt.
AIRLINE bosses today vowed to crack down on air rage incidents on flights coming into Liverpool.
He was on the home leg of a business trip when the air rage incident happened, said David Smith, prosecuting.
AIR rage thug Steven Handy was already blazing drunk when he staggered on board his flight to Spain.
FOOTBALL star turned actor Vinnie Jones (above) has been charged over an alleged air rage incident.
WASHINGTON - By failing to deal with air rage, airlines and government agencies are putting air travelers increasingly at risk, say flight attendants, who allege 4,000 incidents a year of unacceptable passenger behavior.